Announcements

SHAKESPEARE'S WOMEN at Fairleigh Dickenson University

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.256  Thursday, 14 September 2017

 

From:        Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 12, 2017 at 2:11:08 PM EDT

Subject:    SHAKESPEARE'S WOMEN at Fairleigh Dickenson University

 

The topic for the 2017 annual Shakespeare Colloquium at the Florham campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University is “Shakespeare’s Women.” The event will take place on Saturday, October 21 from 9:30-3:30 in Room S-11 (Sturchio Hall) in the Science Building. Sturchio Hall is handicap-accessible.

 

This will be the 25th year of these day-long Shakespeare gathering, which are free and open to the public.  New Jersey teachers are eligible for professional development hours for participating.  The Colloquium coordinator is Dr. Harry Keyishian, Professor Emeritus at Fairleigh Dickinson University. For further information, he may be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The program is supported by the Columbia University Seminar on Shakespeare.

 

At 9:30, Dr. Iska Alter, Professor Emerita from Hofstra University, will discuss “Shakespeare’s Historical Queens,” focusing on the powerful and eloquent women in the early history plays and Richard III. Dr. Alter’s writings on Shakespeare, the Yiddish theater, American drama and ethnic American literature have been published in such journals as Theatre History Studies, Shakespeare Survey, Modern Drama and Shakespeare Bulletin as well as a number of edited collections.

 

At 10:45 Dr. Denise A.Walen of Vassar College discusses “Shakespeare’s Disappearing Women,” focusing on how important female roles have been cut in production over the years, including Juliet, Queen Margaret, Desdemona and Princess Kate, among others. Dr. Walen has directed many stage productions, including Twelfth Night and As You Like It. Her research and teaching focuses on dramatic literature and theory, theater history and women’s studies. She is the author of Constructions of Female Homoeroticism in Early Modern Drama and has published in Shakespeare Quarterly, Shakespeare Survey, andTheatre Journal, among other journals and edited collections.

 

After a lunch break from Noon–1 p.m., Dr. Phyllis Rackin, Professor Emerita at the University of Pennsylvania, will speak about “Cleopatras: What They Mean and Why They Matter.” Dr. Rackin discusses Shakespeare’s Cleopatra as well as other versions, ranging from ancient historians to modern films. A former president of the Shakespeare Association of America, Dr. Rackin  is author of four books on Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s TragediesStages of History: Shakespeare’s English ChroniclesShakespeare and Women, and, with Dr. Jean E. Howard, Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare’s English Histories. She has published more than 30 articles on Shakespeare and related subjects. She was voted one of the 25 Master Teachers of Shakespeare in the last 125 years in a survey of Shakespeare scholars conducted at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

 

At 2:15–3:30 p.m., veteran actress Ellen Barry will perform and discuss some of her favorite Shakespearean women, including those she has performed, such as Lady Percy, Queens Constance and Hermione, and Helena, among others. Ellen Barry has played more than 100 classic and contemporary roles in New York and regional theaters, including Tennessee Williams’ Blanche, Stella and Hannah; Shakespeare’s Kate Percy, Hermione and Constance; Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Maude in Bakersfield Mist and Nat in Rabbit Hole; and both Lorraine and Meg in Sam Shepard’s A Lie of the Mind. As Ella in Ibsen’s John Gabriel Borkman she won an Off-Off Broadway Award, and for Vivian Bearing in Wit she received a Michigan Best Leading Actress award from the Detroit Free Press. Her one-woman show, Lizzie Borden at Eight O’Clock, has played at venues in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. She and her late husband, Paul Barry, founded the New Jersey Shakespeare Festival (now Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey).

 

Harry Keyishian

Professor Emeritus of English

Director Emeritus, FDU Press

Campus at Florham

Fairleigh Dickinson University

285 Madison Avenue, Madison.New Jersey 07940

 

 

 

Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.253  Friday, 8 September 2017

 

From:        Paul Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 8, 2017 at 7:06:02 AM EDT

Subject:    Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time CFP

 

CFP: A Special Issue of the Journal Shakespeare on ‘Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time’

 

2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Richard Burbage, a member of the family who gave us the first purpose-built theatre in Shakespeare’s London. By exploring his life, and those around him, historians have been able to unearth much valuable information about the early modern theatre industry. Scholarship about other theatre people – prompted by their work, the archive, or both – has similarly added to our knowledge of the theatre in Shakespeare’s time. We have learnt about the period’s theatre from Philip Henslowe’s diary, Anthony Munday’s pageants, Richard Brome’s contract, and George Wilkins’ lawsuits. Though biography, according to George Eliot, is ‘a disease of English literature’, there is plenty to gain from considering some aspect of the lived experience of those involved in the theatre. With that in mind, this special issue of Shakespeare seeks submissions relating to theatre people of Shakespeare’s time. 

 

Papers might tackle (but are not limited to):

 

- A study of a theatre person’s life

 

- Some aspect of a theatre person's life, be it an appearance in the documentary record, a life event, or a temporal slice of their biography (per James Shapiro in 1599 and 1606)

 

- The relationships of a given theatre person or theatre people to one another

- The relationship of theatre people to events, persons, or places beyond the theatre industry

 

- Ignored or overlooked figures in the period's theatre 

 

- The relationships between theatre-connected institutions (such as playing companies, the court, the Stationers' Company) and how these affected particular theatre people

 

- How theatre people wielded and/or experienced the power of what E. K. Chambers called the ‘Forces of Control’

 

- A study of the biographical intersections of two or more theatre persons’ lives

 

- What theatre-biography tells us about play-authorship

 

- The during-life and/or posthumous reputations of particular early modern theatre people

 

Submissions (in the range of 5,000-9,000 words) are due by 1 March 2018. Fully‑anonymised typescripts should be sent to Paul Brown This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. All contributions will be peer-reviewed by two independent readers prior to acceptance. 

 

Best,

Paul

 

Lecturer in English

De Montfort University

Leicester, UK.

 

 

 

Apologies: Text Hackathon at De Montfort University

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.252  Thursday, 7 September 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, September 7, 2017

Subject:    Apologies: Text Hackathon at De Montfort University

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

My apologies to Professor Egan regarding Tuesday’s posting of the Text Hackathon at De Montfort University. I neglected to check the embedded web address and as a result it did not bring up the correct page: http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/events/hackathon

 

I have corrected the link in the Archive and am appending the original posting with the active link.

 

Hardy

 

*********************************

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.249  Tuesday, 5 September 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 4, 2017 at 6:11:40 PM EDT

Subject:    Text Hackathon at De Montfort University   

 

Dear SHAKSPERians

 

Those of you interested in what we can do with computers to extract knowledge from big digital texts may want to come to an event at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, on 10-12 November 2017. It’s a 48-hour non-stop Text Hackathon and the details are here:

 

 http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/events/hackathon

 

There are bursaries on offer to help students and tutors attend the event. Literally everyone is welcome.

 

How ‘big’ do we mean? How about all the 19th-century novels?  Or all the speeches in the UK Parliament since the Second World War? Or all the printed books published in England between the arrival of printing in 1475 and the year 1800?

 

Or all the 18th-century newspaper reviews of London theatrical performances? Or all the 11,500,000 leaked Panama Papers (= the Mossack Fonseca files)? If there is a big dataset of text to be investigated, this event can show you how to extract knowledge from it.

 

Everyone is welcome, from those who know nothing about using digital texts to answer interesting questions and would like to find out how it is done, to those who study this topic and those who teach and research it. Free high-quality food—with vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, kosher, halal, and coeliac options—will be served throughout the event.

 

What kind of ‘challenges’ will we tackle? Participants can propose their own challenges to the organizers, but to give you an idea of the sort of thing that groups at the Hackathon might tackle we offer these suggestions:

 

* Do female writers use language differently from male writers?

 

* What parts of the body are most often mentioned in medical texts from the 19th century?

 

* What was said about my home town in newspapers from the 16th and 17th centuries?

 

* What is it about a writer that counts as a distinctive writing style? Do we each have our own distinct style that a computer can tell apart from everyone else’s?

 

* How has the language used to discuss homosexuality in the UK parliament changed over the past 100 years? For example, when did ‘queer’ start to be used in a positive way?

 

* Does each of the supposed authors of a ‘gospel’ in the Christian Bible have a distinct way of writing?

 

* Did William Shakespeare write the plays that are attributed to him?

 

* Are today’s novels easier to read that 19th-century ones?

 

* Do Queen Victoria’s journals reveal anything about her sex life and recreational drug taking?

 

* What kinds of language did American newspapers use to describe African Americans during the Civil War?

 

* What kinds of adjectives were used about Mahatma Ghandi when he was first mentioned in British newspapers and in government reports?

 

* Were ‘teenagers’, as distinct social group, invented in the 1960s, or earlier?

 

Send all enquiries to me, Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

Regards

Gabriel

 

Professor Gabriel Egan, De Montfort University. www.gabrielegan.com

Director of the Centre for Textual Studies http://cts.dmu.ac.uk 

National Teaching Fellow http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ntfs 

Gen. Ed. New Oxford Shakespeare http://www.oxfordpresents.com/ms/nos 

 

 

 

 

An Associate Editor for SHAKSPER

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.251  Thursday, 7 September 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, September 7, 2017

Subject:    An Associate Editor for SHAKSPER

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I am pleased to announce that Professor Stephanie Chamberlain of Southeast Missouri State University has volunteered to be trained as SHAKSPEAR’s Associate Editor. Here is a brief biography of Dr. Chamberlain:

 

Stephanie Chamberlain is Professor of English at Southeast Missouri State University, where she specializes in Shakespeare and early modern English literature. She has publications in The Upstart Crow: A Shakespeare Journal, Journal of the Wooden O Symposium, Medievalia et Humanistica: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Culture, Explorations in Renaissance Culture, College Literature, Quidditas: JRMMRA, Ben Jonson Journal, in Domestic Arrangements in Early Modern England, edited by Kari Boyd McBride, and in the forthcoming Traveling/Travailing Women: Early Modern England and the Wider World, edited by Patricia Akhimie and Bernadette Andrea.

 

Let us all welcome Professor Chamberlain and wish her well in her training.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

Text Hackathon at De Montfort University

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.249  Tuesday, 5 September 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 4, 2017 at 6:11:40 PM EDT

Subject:    Text Hackathon at De Montfort University   

 

Dear SHAKSPERians

 

Those of you interested in what we can do with computers to extract knowledge from big digital texts may want to come to an event at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, on 10-12 November 2017. It’s a 48-hour non-stop Text Hackathon and the details are here:

 

http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/events/hackathon

 

There are bursaries on offer to help students and tutors attend the event. Literally everyone is welcome.

How ‘big’ do we mean? How about all the 19th-century novels?  Or all the speeches in the UK Parliament since the Second World War? Or all the printed books published in England between the arrival of printing in 1475 and the year 1800?

Or all the 18th-century newspaper reviews of London theatrical performances? Or all the 11,500,000 leaked Panama Papers (= the Mossack Fonseca files)? If there is a big dataset of text to be investigated, this event can show you how to extract knowledge from it.

 

Everyone is welcome, from those who know nothing about using digital texts to answer interesting questions and would like to find out how it is done, to those who study this topic and those who teach and research it. Free high-quality food—with vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, kosher, halal, and coeliac options—will be served throughout the event.

 

What kind of ‘challenges’ will we tackle? Participants can propose their own challenges to the organizers, but to give you an idea of the sort of thing that groups at the Hackathon might tackle we offer these suggestions:

 

* Do female writers use language differently from male writers?

 

* What parts of the body are most often mentioned in medical texts from the 19th century?

 

* What was said about my home town in newspapers from the 16th and 17th centuries?

 

* What is it about a writer that counts as a distinctive writing style? Do we each have our own distinct style that a computer can tell apart from everyone else’s?

 

* How has the language used to discuss homosexuality in the UK parliament changed over the past 100 years? For example, when did ‘queer’ start to be used in a positive way?

 

* Does each of the supposed authors of a ‘gospel’ in the Christian Bible have a distinct way of writing?

 

* Did William Shakespeare write the plays that are attributed to him?

 

* Are today’s novels easier to read that 19th-century ones?

 

* Do Queen Victoria’s journals reveal anything about her sex life and recreational drug taking?

 

* What kinds of language did American newspapers use to describe African Americans during the Civil War?

 

* What kinds of adjectives were used about Mahatma Ghandi when he was first mentioned in British newspapers and in government reports?

 

* Were ‘teenagers’, as distinct social group, invented in the 1960s, or earlier?

 

Send all enquiries to me, Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

Regards

Gabriel

 

Professor Gabriel Egan, De Montfort University. www.gabrielegan.com

Director of the Centre for Textual Studies http://cts.dmu.ac.uk

National Teaching Fellow http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ntfs

Gen. Ed. New Oxford Shakespeare http://www.oxfordpresents.com/ms/nos

 

 

 

GW MEMSI's Annual Shakespeare Lecture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.244  Monday, 4 September 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Monday, September 4, 2017

Subject:    GW MEMSI's Annual Shakespeare Lecture

 

Please join us for the George Washington University’s Medieval & Early Modern Studies Institute’s 

Annual Shakespeare Lecture and reception with Dr. Jonathan Hope

 

Friday, September 8th

 

Monstrous Devices or Shakespeare Machines? 

Can computers read Hamlet for you?

 

4-5:30 pm, Post Hall (on GWU’s Mount Vernon Campus)

Free and open to the public; free shuttle to Mount Vernon campus (more information available here)

 

Please join us as we celebrate the start of the academic school year with our sixth Annual Shakespeare Lecture and reception. All are welcome.

 

In this talk, Professor Hope will explore how computers, digital texts, data visualization, and statistics are changing the ways we read Shakespeare. In it, Professor Hope takes up questions like: How are Shakespeare’s plays different if we convert them into bags of words instead of books of pages or speeches on stages? What if we count the words instead of reading them? What if machines allow us to read everything his contemporaries printed at the same time we read Shakespeare? In doing so, Professor Hope shows how readily available tools can provide an “in” to texts that might surprise your professors and reveal how everything people tell you about Shakespeare’s inventive vocabulary is wrong. Using these tools we’ll see instead how surprisingly average Shakespeare turns out to be. 

 

Dr. Jonathan Hope is a professor at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland and a contributor to the Mellon-funded, interdisciplinary project Visualizing English Print. He is the author of numerous books, including Shakespeare and Language: (Arden 2010), Shakespeare’s Grammar (Arden 2003), and The Authorship of Shakespeare’s Plays (Cambridge UP 1994). His teaching and research focuses on the intersection of language and literature: he uses techniques from linguistics to explore literary texts as evidence for the linguistic history of English.  

 

For more information contact: Holly Dugan, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Please mark your calendar as well for GW MEMSI’s two upcoming symposia, “The Future of the Past: Race, Inclusion, Change” (October 16) and “Touching the Past (Again)” (March 2-3)

 

All events this year celebrate the tenth year of the Institute’s flourishing at GW. Thank you for your decade of support!

 

 

 

The Folger Institute Fall Faculty Weekend Seminar

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.240  Tuesday, 29 August 2017

 

From:        Elyse Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 28, 2017 at 11:17:45 AM EDT

Subject:    The Folger Institute Fall Faculty Weekend Seminar

 

Dear SHAKESPER subscribers,

 

The Folger Institute will be offering a fall faculty weekend seminar from 3-4 November: 

Shakespeare’s Virtues: Ethics, Entertainment, and Education
Julia Reinhard Lupton

Faculty Weekend Seminar
Sponsored by the Folger Institute Center for Shakespeare Studies

 

Virtue belongs to ethics, where it harbors deep affinities with performance, whether in Aristotle’s emphasis on habit and practice, in the link between virtue and the virtual through ideas of latency and dynamism, or in the qualities of the virtuoso as an expert performer of multiple arts and knowledges. This two-day seminar will explore the connections among ethics, entertainment, and education, using Shakespeare’s works as both laboratory and studio. The powerful connections among moral philosophy, physical performance, and liberal education have much to teach us about what the arts and humanities have to offer to education today. The seminar will invite participants to consider the forms of Renaissance entertainment explored and practiced in Shakespeare’s plays in the context of a range of historical and modern discourses, including medical humanities, environmental theater, devised theater, and distributed and embodied cognition. The ultimate concern of the seminar is to address virtue as a switch point between popular performance, moral philosophy, and theories and practices of humanist education, considered historically and in the contemporary moment.

 

Director: Julia Reinhard Lupton is Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine. Her most recent monographs are Thinking with Shakespeare: Essays on Politics and Life (2011) and Citizen-Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology (2005). She had edited several volumes, including Arden Critical Guide to Romeo and Juliet, Political Theology and Early Modernity (2012; with Graham Hammill) and Shakespeare and Hospitality (2016; with David Goldstein). Shakespeare Dwelling: Designs for the Theater of Life is forthcoming from the University of Chicago.

 

Schedule: Friday and Saturday, 3 – 4 November 2017

 

Apply: 5 September 2017 for admission and grants-in-aid.

Please contact the Folger Institute at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions.

 

Best,

Elyse Martin 

Program Assistant 

Folger Institute 

Folger Shakespeare Library 

201 East Capitol Street SE

Washington, DC 20003

Phone (202) 675-0333 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

@champs_elyse

 

 

 

Latest Shakespeare Festivals and Plays List

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.239  Tuesday, 29 August 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Subject:    Latest Shakespeare Festivals and Plays List

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Kristin Backert has just provided me the latest version of the Shakespeare Festivals and Plays.

 

It can be found here: https://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/shakespeare-festivals-and-plays

 

Please contact Kristin about any corrections, additions, or suggestions: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

I would publicly like to than Kristin for her valuable contributions to SHAKSPER. Here, Here!!!

 

Hardy

 

 

 

Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.235  Tuesday, 22 August 2017

 

[1] From:        Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 21, 2017 at 1:26:47 PM EDT

     Subj:         Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun

 

[2] From:        Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 21, 2017 at 1:49:30 PM EDT

     Subj:         Vanderbilt Announces that Ann Cook (Calhoun) Has Died

 

[3] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         Tuesday, August 22, 2017

     Subj:         Ann and Gerry: A Remembrance

 

 

[1]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 21, 2017 at 1:26:47 PM EDT

Subject:    Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun

 

I learned last week from Kim West that Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun passed away.  Kim wrote:

 

“Ann and Gerry both died yesterday – August 13, 2017.   I was there for the weekend with her daughters – we spent Saturday afternoon at the hospice with both Ann and Gerry, who were together in the same lovely hospice room.  Ann’s daughter Lee Ann called me at 1:00 yesterday morning to let me know Gerry had passed.  I went to the hospice and stayed with Ann and her daughters most of the day.  When I arrived in Birmingham, Amy texted me that Ann passed around 5:30.  Ann’s death was due to complications from surgery, and Gerry from advanced Lowy body dementia. 

 

I assure you that Ann and Gerry went peacefully and without suffering – both slept quietly, holding hands.  As the grief lessens, I think it will be a great comfort to know they exited together, with high drama, and transcendent love. 

 

There will be a memorial service for Ann and Gerry on September 12, 2017 at Christ Church Cathedral in Nashville, TN.  Her daughters contact information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please let your colleagues in the UK and US know of their passing. “

Steven Urkowitz

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 21, 2017 at 1:49:30 PM EDT

Subject:    Vanderbilt Announces that Ann Cook (Calhoun) Has Died

 

Vanderbilt University has announced that Professor Emerita Ann Cook has died. Ann was a founding member of the International Shakespeare Association and an executive secretary of the Shakespeare Association of America.

 

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/08/18/distinguished-shakespeare-scholar-ann-cook-calhoun-dies/

 

Kurt Daw, Ph.D.

Professor of Theater Arts

San Francisco State University

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Subject:    Ann and Gerry: A Remembrance

 

I was saddened to learn of the passing of Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun. However, I was reminded of a pleasant meal I once shared with them.

 

At an early Blackfriars Conference, when I was a complete unknown rather than just the unknown I am now, I went for a meal at the restaurant that used to be in the old train station in Staunton. While I was waiting, Ann and Gerry walked in and asked me if I wanted to share the table with them. Flattered, I, of course, said, yes. I still remember what I had—pecan encrusted trout (I am a vegetarian who eats seafood, primarily at restaurants). We had an enjoyable repast. When it came time for the bill, Gerry picked it up, and despite my protestations, paid it. They were extremely nice and kind people.

 

I remember leaving the restaurant, thinking to myself, I had a meal with Ann Jennalie Cook and Gerry Calhoun.

 

From then on when we meet, we smiled and acknowledged each other. 

 

Ann and Gerry were inseparable in life as in death. They will be missed.

 

Hardy Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

 

 

 

Peter Milward

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.233  Sunday, 20 August 2017

 

From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 19, 2017 at 10:21:17 AM EDT

Subject:    Peter Milward

 

Fr. Peter Milward, the great pioneer of Shakespeare and Catholicism studies, has died.  His work was the basis of the ‘Catholic’ turn later taken by Greenblatt, Gary Taylor, and so many others. The current TV series, “Will,” whatever its merits, can now assume the plausibility of the Catholic context because of the kind of work Milward did.  I hope to see a more adequate notice.

 

Dennis Taylor

President Emeritus 

BCARF (Boston College Association of Retired Faculty)

 

 

 

SHAKSPER’s Future

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.231  Friday, 18 August 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, August 18, 2017

Subject:   SHAKSPER’s Future

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

No one has stepped up to be trained to take my mantle when I am away or decided to no longer be SHAKSPER’s editor, moderator, owner.

 

I thought about announcing mine or SHAKSPER’s death as Louis Marder did on Shakespeare Newsletter, but I am too introverted to do something like that.

 

So, I will keep on as long as I am able or until someone expresses a wish to be trained to edit SHAKSPER.

 

Faithfully yours,

Hardy

 

 

 

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