Announcements

American Shakespeare Center Announces 2019-20 Season

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.138  Friday, 22 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2019 at 11:42:33 AM EDT

Subject:    American Shakespeare Center Announces 2019-20 Season

 

https://www.americantheatre.org/2019/03/04/american-shakespeare-center-announces-2019-20-season/?fbclid=IwAR3j84iIEjqLx3Nz8--W_NhLk2W-Fgw8omrcmnly1GX82CUBSK5tV2UZ1L8

 

American Shakespeare Center Announces 2019-20 Season

The season will mark the first under new artistic director Ethan McSweeny.

 

STAUNTON, VA.: American Shakespeare Center (ASC) has announced the 2019-20 season lineup, the first under new artistic director Ethan McSweeny.

 

“One of the first things I learned after arriving in Staunton is that ASC’s artistic year is really made up of five distinct seasons, each featuring its own ensemble of actors and artists and each with a slightly different approach to exploring our commitment to Shakespearean performance conditions,” said McSweeny in a statement. “For my first summer, I wanted to emphasize the power of repertory theatre to tell stories bigger than just one play as well as invite audiences to spend a destination weekend with ASC.”

 

The company’s summer programming will be a trio of complimentary plays, kicking off with Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caeser (June 25-Nov. 30), a cautionary tale about the ripple effects of political assassination. McSweeny will direct.

 

Next up will be Antony and Cleopatra (June 26-Nov. 30), by Shakespeare, a tragedy about the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony during the Final War of the Roman Republic. Sharon Ott will direct.

 

The summer festival will round out with George Bernard Shaw’s Caesar and Cleopatra (Aug. 8-Nov. 29), a prequel to Antony and Cleopatra, that depicts a fictional relationship between the old general and the young queen. Eric Tucker will direct.

 

The company will also present special events in the summer, including Midsummer 90 (July 13-Sept. 8), a 90-minute adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Winkelstein will direct.

 

Special programming will also include the Heiftez International Music Institute (July 2-Aug. 6) and the Staunton Music Festival (Aug. 11-18).

 

The fall repertory season will include The Willard Suitcases (Sept. 25-Dec. 1), with music and lyrics by Julianne Wick Davis, about the discovery of a handful of forgotten suitcases found at the Willard Psychiatric Center. McSweeny will direct.

 

Just in time for the holidays will be A Christmas Carol (Dec. 5-29), adapted by James McClure from Charles Dickens, about a miserly man’s journey to discovering the magic of the holidays. Stephanie Holladay Earl will direct.

 

The company’s touring programming will include Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (begins Sept.), a comedy with intertwined lovers, transformations, and fairies. Nathan Winkelstein will direct.

 

Next up will be Shakespeare’s Imogen (begins Sept.), formerly known as Cymbeline, about the lengths the King of Britain will go to secure the royal bloodline. Vanessa Morosco will direct.

 

Another touring production will be The Grapes of Wrath (begins Sept.), adapted by Frank Galati from John Steinbeck, about a poor family driven from their homestead in Oklahoma because of drought who set out for a new life in California during the Great Depression. José Zayas will direct.

 

Founded in 1988 as Shenandoah Shakespeare Express, the company became American Shakespeare Center in 2005. Its mission is to explore the English Renaissance stage through performance and education.

 

 

 

CFP: Shakespeare and Morality Symposium

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.135  Thursday, 21 March 2019

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2019 at 10:23:46 AM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers - Shakespeare and Morality Symposium 

 

Call for Papers - Shakespeare and Morality Symposium hosted by Surrey Shakespeare Centre at the Guildford School of Acting 

 

Shakespeare and Morality Symposium

June 21, 2019

 

Surrey Shakespeare Centre
Guildford School of Acting

Stag Hill Campus
University of Surrey
Guildford

 

We invite papers on the topic of Shakespeare and Morality in criticism, performance, and theory. Themes may include but are not limited to: authority, loyalty, fairness, sanctity, care, and liberty. We encourage papers from scholars in both literary and performance studies, as well as teachers from English or Drama departments who are currently teaching Shakespeare at A-level.

 

The aim of this one-day symposium is to bring together leading scholars, teachers, and students who are working on Shakespeare and Morality, or Renaissance Ethics, to share their research.

 

If you’d like to participate, please send a 300-word abstract to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Tuesday, April 30, 2019

 

Neema Parvini

Senior Lecturer in English

University of Surrey

Guildford

 

 

 

American Shakespeare Center at the 43rd OVSC

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.134  Thursday, 21 March 2019

 

From:        Joe Sullivan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2019 at 5:11:48 PM EDT

Subject:    American Shakespeare Center at the 43rd OVSC

 

We are happy to announce a new addition to the 43rd Annual Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference, which will be held at Marietta College from June 28-30, 2019.  

 

The American Shakespeare Center will be represented to offer Text and Performance workshops on the topics of Shakespeare’s Verse, Rhetoric, Cue Scripts, and Textual Variants.

 

The deadline for paper and panel proposals is Friday, April 26, 2019

 

Here is our call for papers: 

 

Shakespeare Nations

The 43rd Annual Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference

Marietta College (Ohio)

June 28·30, 2019

 

    Plenary speaker: Ruben Espinosa, University of Texas at El Paso

    Emerging Scholar speaker: Vanessa Corredera, Andrews University

    Text and Performance workshops: The American Shakespeare Center

    Performances by Marietta College’s Shakespeare in the Park Festival:

    Romeo and Juliet, directed by Emily Heugatter, University of Central Oklahoma.

    Bye Bye Birdie, with music directed by Peter Sour

 

The conference welcomes abstracts for papers, panels, workshops, and roundtables that examine Shakespeare’s representations of group(s) as well as proposals that examine how Shakespeare’s works have animated groups over time. We hope to see proposals that come to these issues from a broad range of perspectives and approaches.

 

In addition to the many ways that Shakespeare’s works explore the search for individual identity, the plays and poems also concern themselves with group dynamics: family, friendship, alliance, faction, race, gender, nation, mob. These cohere and collide in early modern literature in ways still relevant to our time. Characters balance their senses of belonging to place and time such as bloodlines and birthplaces against abstract senses such as citizenries and faiths and even these borders are revealed as porous and unstable. They travel to new locales and negotiate the preservation or loss of old identities, with the assumption of or resistance to new ones. As importantly, for centuries, the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries have inspired imitation/adaptation/incorporation (sometimes rejection) of what they view on stage into their own group identities. In his time, Shakespeare collaborated with and copied from his contemporaries, but after 1660, acting troupes reintroduced his plays into their repertories or adapted them. Today, some actors designate themselves as Shakespearean.

 

Travelers become Shakespearean throngs in Verona. Immigrants bring with them worlds of culture, influencing and being influenced by what they bring and what they find. Shakespeare as cultural symbol has been used to foster faction, competition or exclusion of group identity.

 

Curricula commonly require (some do not) the study of Shakespeare. Activist Shakespeareans community-build through their essays and public speeches. Academics form conferences like the OVSC. People even form societies to advocate the position that Shakespeare's work was written by someone else.

 

Presenters may submit their work for consideration by the editors of the Selected Papers of the Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference.

 

https://ideaexchange.uakron.edu/spovsc/

 

The conference is open to graduate students for regular sessions, and to undergraduate students for roundtable discussions. Both graduate students and undergraduate students are encouraged to submit papers for The Rick Smith Memorial Prize competition to Professor Hillary Nunn at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Friday, May 17.

 

Please send abstracts of 250-500 words to Joseph Sullivan at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  The deadline for abstracts is Friday, April 26.

 

Check out our website at http://www.ovshakes.org/

 

Follow us on Twitter @OVSC

 

 

 

Yahoo E-Mail Accounts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.130  Wednesday, 20 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Subject:    Yahoo E-Mail Accounts

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Over the past few days, more than a dozen Yahoo e-mail accounts stopped accepting mailings from SHAKSPER, and I have had to delete those accounts.

 

Is there anyone out there who has a clue about what is going on with Yahoo?

 

Also, should you know anyone who subscribes to SHAKSPER with a Yahoo account, please inform those people that their Yahoo accounts are not accepting SHAKSPER, and I have had to delete their accounts.

 

Thanks,

Hardy

 

 

 

Armenian Shakespeare Association International Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.129  Wednesday, 20 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2019 at 7:11:08 AM EDT

Subject:    Armenian Shakespeare Association International Conference

 

http://www.armenianshakespeare.org

 

The Third ASA International Conference 

Venice, Italy

Sunday 14 and Monday 15th July 2019

The Armenian Shakespeare Association (ASA) is delighted to invite Shakespearean scholars, translators, theatre critics, directors, actors and research students across the world to its third international conference in Venice.

 

“Shakespeare and Venice: Between the Crossroads of East and West”

Dedicated to the 130th Anniversary of Shakespearean Actor

Vahram Papazian (1888-1968)

 

The Armenian Shakespeare Association (ASA) invites Shakespearean scholars, translators, theatre critics and research students across the world to its third international conference. The conference is organised with the support of His Holiness Archbishop Boghos Lévon Zékiyan and the Mekhitarist Fathers in Venice.

 

Confirmed keynote speakers and academics from Taiwan, Japan, India, USA, UK, Poland, Serbia, Romania, France, Spain, Italy, Brazil, the Middle East, Armenia etc.

 

Visit to the historical island of San Lazzaro degli Armeni and tour of the hidden treasures of Venice, social and cultural programme

The conference takes place at Collegio Armeno Moorat-Raphael situated at Palazzo Ca'Zenobio in the centre of Venice - an impressive baroque style palace built in 1690 - not far fromOthello’s House”.   Among numerous prominent Armenians of the past 150 years, actor-director-writer Vahram Papazian – to whom the conference is dedicated also studied here as a young man. Guided tour of the island San Lazzaro degli Armeni (situated in the Venetian lagoon, few minutes ride from St. Marco station by vaporetto) is offered to participants. Monastery San Lazzaro is the home of Mekhitarist Fathers since 1717 housing an extraoridanry international art collection, library of ancient manuscripts and functioning Armenian Church. We have also arranged a tour of ‘the hidden’ gems of Venice with a resident architect.

 

Papers should fit in one of the following seminars:

 

  • ‘The Outsiders of Venice’: Othello and The Merchant of Venice in adaptations across countries
  • ‘Shakespeare and/in Exile’: through civil wars, autocracies and censorships of past or present
  • ‘Shakespeare in Arts’: cinematographic, music, ballet and literary creations inspired by the Bard
  • ‘Translating Shakespeare’: linguistic, geographic and poetic trials (translators particularly welcome)
  • ‘Shakespearean Collections’: public and private libraries, research centres and digital collections
  • ‘Shakespeare and the Venetian Myth’: the truth and the fantasy, ‘Shakespeare and Italy’: round table (open to suggestions)

Please send your abstract of 300 words, application form and fee of £80 via PayPal link before the new deadline, 30 March 2019. For any questions please contact ASA: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Visit the ASA website to download the application form and for payment: www.armenianshakespeare.org

 

 

For all inquiries contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

NEW APPLICATION DEADLINE: 30th March 2019

 

 

 

Book Announcement: The Routledge Research Companion to Anglo-Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.116  Thursday, 14 March 2019

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 13, 2019 at 5:01:17 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: The Routledge Research Companion to Anglo-Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture

 

Dear Shaksperians,

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of “The Routledge Research Companion to Anglo-Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture” (Routledge, 2019, 528 pp., 9781472410733).

 

The aim of this Companion volume is to provide scholars and advanced graduate students with a comprehensive and authoritative state-of-the-art review of current research work on Anglo-Italian Renaissance studies. Written by a team of international scholars and experts in the field, the chapters are grouped into two large areas of influence and intertextuality, corresponding to the dual way in which early modern England looked upon the Italian world from the English perspective – Part 1: "Italian literature and culture" and Part 2: "Appropriations and ideologies". In the first part, prominent Italian authors, artists, and thinkers are examined as a direct source of inspiration, imitation, and divergence. The variegated English response to the cultural, ideological, and political implications of pervasive Italian intertextuality, in interrelated aspects of artistic and generic production, is dealt with in the second part. Constructed on the basis of a largely interdisciplinary approach, the volume offers an in-depth and wide-ranging treatment of the multifaceted ways in which Italy’s material world and its iconologies are represented, appropriated, and exploited in the literary and cultural domain of early modern England. For this reason, contributors were asked to write essays that not only reflect current thinking but also point to directions for future research and scholarship, while a purposefully conceived bibliography of primary and secondary sources and a detailed index round off the volume.

 

 

Reviews

 

“This wide-ranging collection brings together the best current work in Anglo-Italian studies and forecasts future developments. Theoretically sophisticated and intellectually rigorous, the essays here treat major and minor figures, works, and genres, all the while illuminating hidden movements and cross-currents in literature, history, theology, and other disciplines. The volume, in toto, documents the reciprocal circulation of energies that powered both the Italian and English Renaissances. Prof. Marrapodi’s international team of distinguished contributors and bright new voices will inspire and guide scholarly conversations for a long time to come.”

 

--Robert S. Miola, Gerard Manley Hopkins Professor of English / Lecturer in Classics Loyola University Maryland

 

 

“Reading this new collection, one is taken aback by how extensive and profound the cultural conversation between early modern Italy and England actually was. Preceded by a deeply researched introduction by Michele Marrapodi, the essays manage to anatomize this dauntingly complex field afresh and rethink familiar figures and configurations while adding a host of unfamiliar ones. What emerges is not just the one-way traffic of “influence” but dynamic and layered exchanges both within and between two separate cultures and cultural moments. It is equally good at recounting the Italian rediscovery of ancient figures, such as Seneca and Lucretius (long prior to their English impact), as it is at exploring original Italian cultural inventions such as courtliness, "civil conversation", and reason of state."

 

-- John Gillies, Professor in Literature, University of Essex

 

 

“In this ambitious and extraordinarily useful volume, ably assembled by Michele Marrapodi, distinguished senior and junior scholars from Italy, Great Britain, and North America revisit the crucial questions surrounding the influence of Italy, its literature and its culture on England in the age of Shakespeare. Among the volume’s many virtues are its double focus on the original Italian texts and contexts and their appropriation, transformation, and re-visioning in English hands. Equally admirable is its revisitation of the multiple still-valid acquisitions of past scholarship, even while defining the current “state of the field” and its future possibilities. Finally, while the volume’s primary inspiration is literary and especially theatrical, it demonstrates a laudable commitment to probing the “mobilities,” ambiguities, and political-ideological-religious investments that inform the complex processes of cultural transmission.”

 

--Albert Russell Ascoli, President, Dante Society of America, Terrill Distinguished Professor, Department of Italian Studies, University of California, Berkeley.

 

 

For a complete description and contents, please visit the Routledge website:

 

https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Research-Companion-to-Anglo-Italian-Renaissance-Literature/Marrapodi/p/book/9781472410733

 

 

Michele Marrapodi

University of Palermo, Italy.

 

 

 

Possible Lost Submissions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.113  Wednesday, 13 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Subject:    Possible Lost Submissions

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I accidentally deleted a bunch of files in, my Editor account. I have tried to recover all of today’s submissions; but if you do not see a message you sent, please resend it.

 

Apologies,

Hardy

 

 

Possible Lost Submissions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.113  Wednesday, 13 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Subject:    Possible Lost Submissions

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I accidentally deleted a bunch of files in, my Editor account. I have tried to recover all of today’s submissions; but if you do not see a message you sent, please resend it.

 

Apologies,

Hardy

 

 

Shakespeare Between the World Wars

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.110  Tuesday, 12 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 12, 2019 at 9:22:19 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Between the World Wars

 

https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137590633

 

Shakespeare Between the World Wars

The Anglo-American Sphere

By Robert Sawyer

 

Shakespeare Between the World Wars draws parallels between Shakespearean scholarship, criticism, and production from 1920 to 1940 and the chaotic years of the Interwar era. The book begins with the scene in Hamlet where the Prince confronts his mother, Gertrude. Just as the closet scene can be read as a productive period bounded by devastation and determination on both sides, Robert Sawyer shows that the years between the World Wars were equally positioned. Examining performance and offering detailed textual analyses, Sawyer considers the re-evaluation of Shakespeare in the Anglo-American sphere after the First World War. Instead of the dried, barren earth depicted by T. S. Eliot and others in the 1920s and 1930s, this book argues that the literary landscape resembled a paradoxically fertile wasteland, for just below the arid plain of the time lay the seeds for artistic renewal and rejuvenation which would finally flourish in the later twentieth century.  

 

 

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Archives Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.109  Tuesday, 12 March 2019

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 11, 2019 at 8:42:36 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare’s Globe Archives Online

 

https://www.thestage.co.uk/news/2019/shakespeares-globe-makes-archives-available-online/

 

Shakespeare’s Globe makes archives available online

 

Shakespeare’s Globe has digitised its archive for the first time, including rarely seen items such as annotated scripts and show reports from more than 200 productions.

 

The archive goes back to Sam Wanamaker’s initial vision for the London theatre and details the venue’s construction as well as containing material from across the first 20 years.

 

These include prompt books, wardrobe notes, music, photographs and programmes, and are intended to give researchers “unprecedented access to the history of Shakespeare’s Globe”.

 

Highlights include oral histories from figures including Mark Rylance and Zoe Wanamaker as well as front-of-house show reports detailing audience behaviour at thousands of performances since the Globe opened in 1997.

 

The project is a collaboration between the Globe and academic source publisher Adam Matthew Digital, which provides primary sources for teaching and research.

 

Farah Karim-Cooper, head of higher education and research at the Globe, said: “Academic research is increasingly preoccupied with performance history and practice, so we’re delighted that the Globe’s important and exciting performance archive, showcasing our experimental theatremaking over the last 20 years, can now be accessed by scholars and student around the world thanks to the work of Adam Matthew Digital.”

 

 

 

Shakespeare Census

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 30.101  Sunday, 10 March 2019

 

From:        Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 8, 2019 at 3:13:30 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare Census

 

Dear all,

 

We are very pleased to announce the launch of the new Shakespeare Census <www.shakespearecensus.org>. The Shakespeare Census is a database that attempts to locate and describe all extant copies of all editions of Shakespeare’s works through 1700 (excluding the four folio editions). 

 

The Shakespeare Census enables new work in book history, bibliography, and the reception of Shakespeare’s works, revealing copy-specific information that has been “hiding in plain sight”. It promotes scholarly discussion and collaborative research by assigning each copy a unique identifier (the SC number). Over time, details will continue be added about each copy, including its condition, binding, marginalia, and provenance, along with a bibliography of scholarship discussing that specific copy. Currently the Shakespeare Census includes 1752 copies, and there are certainly more to be located. Many copies are not in Henrietta Bartlett’s Census or ESTC.

 

We invite you to explore the site and to contribute to it by alerting us to copies not yet listed, by contributing copy-specific information, and by identifying scholarship to be added to the copy-specific bibliography.

 

We are especially interested in hearing from librarians, collectors, and dealers who know of copies that should be in the database but aren’t. If you curate a collection that includes copies covered by the Census, we will set up a Librarian account for you so you can submit your copies and edit their details directly into the database. If you are a collector or dealer and know of privately held copies, please get in touch as well. We are eager to include these and are happy to anonymize as needed.

 

We hope the Shakespeare Census will be an exciting new resource for your work!

 

Sincerely,

Zachary Lesser, University of Pennsylvania

Adam G. Hooks, University of Iowa

 

 

 

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