Announcements

Shakespeare and Marx Conference at Garrick’s Temple

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.197  Wednesday, 14 June 2017

 

From:        Paul Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 14, 2017 at 12:59:40 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Marx Conference at Garrick’s Temple

 

KINGSTON SHAKESPEARE SEMINAR AT GARRICK’S TEMPLE

 

 

SHAKESPEARE AND MARX

SATURDAY JUNE 24, 2017

 

10.00: Chair: Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

 David Hawkes (Arizona State University)
‘Marx and Shakespeare Today: Towards an Ethics of Representation’

 

11.00: Coffee

 

11.30: Chair: Kiernan Ryan (Royal Holloway University)

Chris Fitter (Rutgers University)
‘Shakespeare and the Tudor Ferment: A Marxist Homecoming?’

Gabriel Egan (De Montfort University):
‘Shakespeare::Marx && community::writing’

 

13.00: Lunch (Bell Inn, Hampton)

 

14.00: Chair: David Schalkwyk (Queen Mary University)

 Christian Smith (Independent scholar, Berlin)
‘“Ay, his breast. So says the bond”:
Marx, Shakespeare and the Theory of Labour Power’

Martin McQuillan (Kingston University):
‘Marx’s Timon: Reading and Quantitative Easing’

 

15.30: Tea

 

16.00: Chair: Aaron Kitch (Bowdoin College)

Hugh Grady (Arcadia University):
‘Shakespeare and Marx:  A Select Genealogy’

 

17.00: Round Table Discussion

 

19.45: Chamber Concert: Marx’s Music (Lovekyn Consort)

 

Tickets are £20 (includes sandwich lunch, coffee and tea) and £12 for the concert.

 

All proceeds go to supporting the Temple.

 

Please register for the symposium and / or concert on Eventbrite

Getting to the Temple

See also the Facebook event page!

 

 

 

 

Planned Interruption

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.196  Wednesday, 14 June 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Subject:    Planned Interruption

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Tomorrow afternoon, I leave for two weeks in England—Devon and West Sussex.

 

Keep submissions coming and I will get to them when I return July 1.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

An Evening with the Executive Who Oversees the Olivier Awards

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.195  Monday, 12 June 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 10, 2017 at 9:47:18 PM EDT

Subject:    An Evening with the Executive Who Oversees the Olivier Awards

 

An Evening with London Arts 

Executive Julian Bird, Who 

Oversees the Olivier Awards 

 

Monday, June 12, at 6 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

A key member of the audience for this year’s Tony Awards will be Julian Bird, who oversees the British ceremonies that parallel America’s most prestigious theatrical gathering. 

 

Mr. Bird heads both the Society of London Theatre, the West End producers’ organization that bestows the Olivier Awards each spring, and UK Theatre, a consortium that represents performing-arts institutions throughout the nation and hosts a UK Theatre Awards luncheon each October in the City’s historic Guildhall. 

 

In recent years, the Shakespeare Guild has presented its annual Gielgud Award in this venerable setting, paying homage to Sir Donald Sinden in 2014, Dame Eileen Atkins in 2015, and Vanessa Redgrave in 2016. 

 

Mr. Bird works closely with his American counterparts, and among the many topics to be explored is speculation that Kevin Kline, who received the 2002 Gielgud Award and is favored to win another Tony for his scintillating performance in Present Laughter, may soon be starring in a London production of this Noel Coward classic.    

 

For more about Shakespeare Guild offerings, most of them featuring conversations hosted by John Andrews, visit www.shakesguild.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

B&L 10.2 (Shakespeare and Dance)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.194  Wednesday, 7 June 2017

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 5, 2017 at 10:53:02 AM EDT

Subject:    B&L 10.2 (Shakespeare and Dance) is out

 

The new special issue of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation (10.2), “Shakespeare and Dance,” guest-edited by Elizabeth Klett, is out! This beautifully illustrated release includes video footage of dances from Romeo and Juliet, in an essay by Emily Winerock (http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/783478/show); gorgeous pics of a Tempest ballet in an essay by Elizabeth Klett; and “raunchy dances” from Omkara in an essay by Madhavi Biswas. Other contributors include Sheila Cavanagh and Linda McJannet, Amy Rodgers, Nona Monahin, Lisa Dickson and Andrea Downie, and Emma Atwood. Please

share widely: http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/

 

Sujata Iyengar

Professor of English

Co-general editor of  Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Department of English

University of Georgia

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (editorial correspondence)

 

 

 

Shakespeare Dialogues with Samuel Crowl and Karin Coonrod

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.158  Wednesday, 19 April 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 19, 2017 at 12:53:53 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Dialogues with Samuel Crowl and Karin Coonrod

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with

Film Historian Samuel Crowl

And Director Karin Coonrod

 

Wednesday, April 26, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

In 1980, when SAMUEL CROWL wrote a seminal article for Shakespeare Quarterly about Chimes at Midnight, an Orson Welles adaptation of the two parts of Henry IV (with the director playing Falstaff to John Gielgud’s King and Keith Baxter’s Prince), this 1966 picture was considered a failure. It’s now regarded as a classic, and Crowl, an award-winning professor at Ohio University, is recognized as one of today’s leading film historians, with titles such as Shakespeare Observed (1992), Shakespeare at the Cineplex (2002), Shakespeare and Film: A Norton Guide (2008), and Screen Adaptations: Hamlet (2014) to his credit. We’d love to welcome you to an engaging discussion of a 453-year-old has-been who continues to amaze today’s screenwriters.  

 

Thursday, April 27 at 6 p.m.

The English-Speaking Union 

144 East 39th Street, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

In July 2016 director KARIN COONROD mounted a stirring, bilingual Merchant of Venice in the original Ghetto, a site whose 500th            anniversary had been commemorated in a March 9 New York Times feature story. The Times returned to La Serenissima for the gala opening, as well as for a symposium at which F. Murray Abraham recited “Hath not a Jew eyes” and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over a debate featuring Stephen Greenblatt and James Shapiro. A few days later, during its Shakespeare 400 festivities in London, the International Shakespeare Association devoted a special session to this resonant occasion. We hope you’ll join us as Ms. Coonrod and several of her colleagues reflect on a historic event. 

 

For more about Shakespeare Guild offerings, most of them featuring conversations with John Andrews, visit www.shakesguild.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

April 21 Conference at UPenn: In-Quarto, A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.155  Monday, 17 April 2017

 

From:        Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 14, 2017 at 2:41:29 PM EDT

Subject:    April 21 Conference at UPenn: In-Quarto, A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain 

 

In-Quarto:

A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain

 

Friday, April 21, 2017, 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM

 

Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts

Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor, rooms 626-627

University of Pennsylvania

3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 

Free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance). Advance registration requested.

 

Full program and registration:

http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/in_quarto.html

 

This day-long symposium will bring scholars of Spanish Golden Age and English Renaissance literature into dialogue through focused investigation of a dominant publication form that their dramatic literatures share: the quarto. The English play quarto and the Spanish pliego suelto are composed in quarto gatherings: printed sheets folded twice to make four leaves. The Spanish author Lope de Vega even used this format in the composition process of his dramatic manuscripts. What can we learn from a comparison of quarto publications, across languages and cultural contexts? How did quarto publication shape genres other than drama? Symposium participants will engage directly with books and manuscripts from Kislak Center collections. 

 

Participants: Michael Agnew (Pine Tree Foundation/New York University), Laura Aydelotte (University of Pennsylvania), Claire Bourne (Pennsylvania State University), Roger Chartier (Collège de France/University of Pennsylvania), Steve Vásquez Dolph (University of Pennsylvania), Margaret Greer (Duke University), Seth Kimmel (Columbia University), Zachary Lesser (University of Pennsylvania), Marissa Nicosia (Pennsylvania State University), Victor Sierra Matute (University of Pennsylvania), Peter Stallybrass (University of Pennsylvania)

 

Questions and information:

John Pollack, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Not the Year's Work in English Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.145  Tuesday, 11 April 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Subject:    Re: Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

Editor’s Note: Many have called to my attention that the links in Gabriel Egan’s post “Not the Year's Work in English Studies” did not work. I have apologized to Gabriel and corrected the links in the archive. I normally check all links, but I was in a hurry and did not do so this time. Below is a corrected version of that posting.

 

Hardy

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.141  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 8:26:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

From 2000 to 2016 I wrote the “Shakespeare: Editions and Textual Studies” annual review for the Year’s Work in English Studies published by Oxford University Press. In 2016 I was asked to stand down and so gave up the review, but I continue to attempt to read and evaluate everything published in this field. Since the discipline of formally reviewing scholarship is the best way to make sense of it, I decided to continue writing an annual review and to self-publish it on my website. I am grateful to Ed Pechter for serving as my editor for this new review, saving me from dozens of infelicities and improving the sense in many places. I would be interested to hear from any readers who find this review useful.

 

The review is called Not the Year’s Work in English Studies and it

appears at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/nywes

 

The most recent review is for work published in 2015. My YWES reviews

of scholarship published in previous years are available at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/publications

 

Regards

Gabriel Egan

 

 

 

Explanation for Interruption

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.143  Tuesday, 11 April 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Subject:    Explanation for Interruption

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Last Tuesday evening, I had surgery to decompress the ulnar and median nerves in my right hand/arm. The surgery took three hours, and I spend Tuesday night and Wednesday morning in the hospital with a pain pump. For some time, the fingers in my right hand would become numb and tingling. I put off the surgery as long as I could, but it got to the point that I could not put it off any longer. As usual, I did not anticipate the time it would take for this aging body to recovery enough to take on editing the submissions with my left hand.

 

I should have notified everyone of the upcoming interruption, but as I said I did not anticipate how long it would take me to get back to editing. I am in a brace that runs well beyond my right elbow, designed to immobilize the hand and arm and to protect and the incisions at my carpal tunnel and along my right arm. I am obviously on pain medication and unable to drive for at least the next two weeks, but I feel as though I can slowly handle editing now.

 

My apologies for not informing the subscribers earlier.

 

Hardy

 

PS: I grateful for everyone’s good wishes, but I have enough e-mail for the time being, and I would appreciate your refraining from expressing those kind regards.

 

 

 

Not the Year's Work in English Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.141  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 8:26:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

From 2000 to 2016 I wrote the “Shakespeare: Editions and Textual Studies” annual review for the Year’s Work in English Studies published by Oxford University Press. In 2016 I was asked to stand down and so gave up the review, but I continue to attempt to read and evaluate everything published in this field. Since the discipline of formally reviewing scholarship is the best way to make sense of it, I decided to continue writing an annual review and to self-publish it on my website. I am grateful to Ed Pechter for serving as my editor for this new review, saving me from dozens of infelicities and improving the sense in many places. I would be interested to hear from any readers who find this review useful.

 

The review is called Not the Year’s Work in English Studies and it

appears at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/nywes

 

The most recent review is for work published in 2015. My YWES reviews

of scholarship published in previous years are available at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/publications

 

Regards

Gabriel Egan

 

 

Two Concerts One Week Away! Summer’s Distallation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.140  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Joseph Summer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 3:57:50 PM EDT

Subject:    Two Concerts One Week Away! Summer’s Distallation

 

Lots of exciting things have been happening for the Shakespeare Concerts this month, and hopefully I’ll be able to share more details with you soon. But the most exciting thing right now are our two concerts coming up next weekend! 

 

Our concert, Summer’s Distillation (previously Music for Harp, Horns, and Voice), is now one week away! Join us on Saturday, April 8th, 7:30pm at New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall, and hear all of our fantastic artists in vocal music for voice, harp, and horns.

 

If you’re not able to come to the concert on Saturday in Boston, then maybe you can catch our second iteration on Sunday in Amherst instead! UMass Amherst is holding a full-day event, ‘Interpreting Shakespeare’, with the Shakespeare Concerts as the final event of the day at 7:30pm in the Old Chapel.

 

Round Table & Sonnets, 2-5pm

Panel:
David Katz, Dept. of English, UMass Amherst
Adeline Mueller, Music Dept.-Musicology, Mt. Holyoke College
Nikoo Mamdoohi, Dept. of Theater, UMass Amherst
Roberta M. Marvin, Chair/Professor, Dept. of Music & Dance, UMass Amherst

Round Table:
Marie Roche, Mass. Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies
Joseph Summer, composer & Exec. Director of The Shakespeare Concerts
Benjamin Pesetsky, composer
Robert Eisenstein, Director of Five College Early Music Program
Adeline Mueller, Music Dept.-Musicology, Mt. Holyoke College
Milan Dragicevich, Dept. of Theater, UMass Amherst 

And students from the UMass Department of Theater

 

Concert, 7:30pm

"Summer's Distillation: A Liquid Prisoner Pent in Walls of Glass"

SchumannThree Songs for Voice & Harp, Op. 95
BrahmsFour Songs, Op. 17
Benjamin PesetskySonnet 147 and Our Remedies oft in ourselves do lie 
Joseph Summer: Settings of several Sonnets & O God that I were a man

Jessica Lennick & Jennifer Sgroe, soprano
Thea Lobo & Sophie Michaux, mezzo soprano
Neal Ferreira, tenor
Franzisca Huhn, harp
Kevin Owen & Josh Michal, horn
Tim Ribchester, music director
Joseph Summer, executive director

 

 

CFP New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.139  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Ray Siemens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 2:42:09 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans)

 

[Please redistribute / please excuse x-posting]

 

Call for Proposals: New Technologies and Renaissance Studies

RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans

 

Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America annual meetings have featured panels on the applications of new technology in scholarly research, publishing, and teaching.  Panels at the 2018 meeting will continue to explore the contributions made by new and emerging methodologies and the projects that employ them, both in-person at the conference and online via individual and group virtual presentations.

 

We welcome proposals for in-person and online papers, panels, and or poster / demonstration / workshop presentations on new technologies and their impact on research, teaching, publishing, and beyond, in the context of Renaissance Studies.  Examples of the many areas considered by members of our community can be found in the list of papers presented at the RSA since 2001 (http://bit.ly/1tn6rsd) and in those papers published thus far under the heading of New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (http://bit.ly/1zJiaqp). 

 

Please send proposals before 30 April 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, and a one-paragraph biographical CV, as well as an indication of whether you would consider or prefer an online presentation. We are pleased to be able to offer travel subventions on a competitive basis to graduate students who present on these panels; those wishing to be considered for a subvention should indicate this in their abstract submission.

 

We thank Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages & Renaissance (http://www.itergateway.org) for its generous sponsorship of this series and its related travel subventions since 2001.

 

 

 

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