Announcements

Shakespeare Dialogues with Samuel Crowl and Karin Coonrod

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.158  Wednesday, 19 April 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 19, 2017 at 12:53:53 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Dialogues with Samuel Crowl and Karin Coonrod

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with

Film Historian Samuel Crowl

And Director Karin Coonrod

 

Wednesday, April 26, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

In 1980, when SAMUEL CROWL wrote a seminal article for Shakespeare Quarterly about Chimes at Midnight, an Orson Welles adaptation of the two parts of Henry IV (with the director playing Falstaff to John Gielgud’s King and Keith Baxter’s Prince), this 1966 picture was considered a failure. It’s now regarded as a classic, and Crowl, an award-winning professor at Ohio University, is recognized as one of today’s leading film historians, with titles such as Shakespeare Observed (1992), Shakespeare at the Cineplex (2002), Shakespeare and Film: A Norton Guide (2008), and Screen Adaptations: Hamlet (2014) to his credit. We’d love to welcome you to an engaging discussion of a 453-year-old has-been who continues to amaze today’s screenwriters.  

 

Thursday, April 27 at 6 p.m.

The English-Speaking Union 

144 East 39th Street, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

In July 2016 director KARIN COONROD mounted a stirring, bilingual Merchant of Venice in the original Ghetto, a site whose 500th            anniversary had been commemorated in a March 9 New York Times feature story. The Times returned to La Serenissima for the gala opening, as well as for a symposium at which F. Murray Abraham recited “Hath not a Jew eyes” and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over a debate featuring Stephen Greenblatt and James Shapiro. A few days later, during its Shakespeare 400 festivities in London, the International Shakespeare Association devoted a special session to this resonant occasion. We hope you’ll join us as Ms. Coonrod and several of her colleagues reflect on a historic event. 

 

For more about Shakespeare Guild offerings, most of them featuring conversations with John Andrews, visit www.shakesguild.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

April 21 Conference at UPenn: In-Quarto, A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.155  Monday, 17 April 2017

 

From:        Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 14, 2017 at 2:41:29 PM EDT

Subject:    April 21 Conference at UPenn: In-Quarto, A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain 

 

In-Quarto:

A Symposium on Formats and Meanings in Early Modern England and Spain

 

Friday, April 21, 2017, 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM

 

Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts

Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor, rooms 626-627

University of Pennsylvania

3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 

Free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance). Advance registration requested.

 

Full program and registration:

http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/in_quarto.html

 

This day-long symposium will bring scholars of Spanish Golden Age and English Renaissance literature into dialogue through focused investigation of a dominant publication form that their dramatic literatures share: the quarto. The English play quarto and the Spanish pliego suelto are composed in quarto gatherings: printed sheets folded twice to make four leaves. The Spanish author Lope de Vega even used this format in the composition process of his dramatic manuscripts. What can we learn from a comparison of quarto publications, across languages and cultural contexts? How did quarto publication shape genres other than drama? Symposium participants will engage directly with books and manuscripts from Kislak Center collections. 

 

Participants: Michael Agnew (Pine Tree Foundation/New York University), Laura Aydelotte (University of Pennsylvania), Claire Bourne (Pennsylvania State University), Roger Chartier (Collège de France/University of Pennsylvania), Steve Vásquez Dolph (University of Pennsylvania), Margaret Greer (Duke University), Seth Kimmel (Columbia University), Zachary Lesser (University of Pennsylvania), Marissa Nicosia (Pennsylvania State University), Victor Sierra Matute (University of Pennsylvania), Peter Stallybrass (University of Pennsylvania)

 

Questions and information:

John Pollack, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Not the Year's Work in English Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.145  Tuesday, 11 April 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Subject:    Re: Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

Editor’s Note: Many have called to my attention that the links in Gabriel Egan’s post “Not the Year's Work in English Studies” did not work. I have apologized to Gabriel and corrected the links in the archive. I normally check all links, but I was in a hurry and did not do so this time. Below is a corrected version of that posting.

 

Hardy

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.141  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 8:26:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

From 2000 to 2016 I wrote the “Shakespeare: Editions and Textual Studies” annual review for the Year’s Work in English Studies published by Oxford University Press. In 2016 I was asked to stand down and so gave up the review, but I continue to attempt to read and evaluate everything published in this field. Since the discipline of formally reviewing scholarship is the best way to make sense of it, I decided to continue writing an annual review and to self-publish it on my website. I am grateful to Ed Pechter for serving as my editor for this new review, saving me from dozens of infelicities and improving the sense in many places. I would be interested to hear from any readers who find this review useful.

 

The review is called Not the Year’s Work in English Studies and it

appears at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/nywes

 

The most recent review is for work published in 2015. My YWES reviews

of scholarship published in previous years are available at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/publications

 

Regards

Gabriel Egan

 

 

 

Explanation for Interruption

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.143  Tuesday, 11 April 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Subject:    Explanation for Interruption

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Last Tuesday evening, I had surgery to decompress the ulnar and median nerves in my right hand/arm. The surgery took three hours, and I spend Tuesday night and Wednesday morning in the hospital with a pain pump. For some time, the fingers in my right hand would become numb and tingling. I put off the surgery as long as I could, but it got to the point that I could not put it off any longer. As usual, I did not anticipate the time it would take for this aging body to recovery enough to take on editing the submissions with my left hand.

 

I should have notified everyone of the upcoming interruption, but as I said I did not anticipate how long it would take me to get back to editing. I am in a brace that runs well beyond my right elbow, designed to immobilize the hand and arm and to protect and the incisions at my carpal tunnel and along my right arm. I am obviously on pain medication and unable to drive for at least the next two weeks, but I feel as though I can slowly handle editing now.

 

My apologies for not informing the subscribers earlier.

 

Hardy

 

PS: I grateful for everyone’s good wishes, but I have enough e-mail for the time being, and I would appreciate your refraining from expressing those kind regards.

 

 

 

Not the Year's Work in English Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.141  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 8:26:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Not the Year's Work in English Studies

 

From 2000 to 2016 I wrote the “Shakespeare: Editions and Textual Studies” annual review for the Year’s Work in English Studies published by Oxford University Press. In 2016 I was asked to stand down and so gave up the review, but I continue to attempt to read and evaluate everything published in this field. Since the discipline of formally reviewing scholarship is the best way to make sense of it, I decided to continue writing an annual review and to self-publish it on my website. I am grateful to Ed Pechter for serving as my editor for this new review, saving me from dozens of infelicities and improving the sense in many places. I would be interested to hear from any readers who find this review useful.

 

The review is called Not the Year’s Work in English Studies and it

appears at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/nywes

 

The most recent review is for work published in 2015. My YWES reviews

of scholarship published in previous years are available at:

 

 http://gabrielegan.com/publications

 

Regards

Gabriel Egan

 

 

Two Concerts One Week Away! Summer’s Distallation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.140  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Joseph Summer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 3:57:50 PM EDT

Subject:    Two Concerts One Week Away! Summer’s Distallation

 

Lots of exciting things have been happening for the Shakespeare Concerts this month, and hopefully I’ll be able to share more details with you soon. But the most exciting thing right now are our two concerts coming up next weekend! 

 

Our concert, Summer’s Distillation (previously Music for Harp, Horns, and Voice), is now one week away! Join us on Saturday, April 8th, 7:30pm at New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall, and hear all of our fantastic artists in vocal music for voice, harp, and horns.

 

If you’re not able to come to the concert on Saturday in Boston, then maybe you can catch our second iteration on Sunday in Amherst instead! UMass Amherst is holding a full-day event, ‘Interpreting Shakespeare’, with the Shakespeare Concerts as the final event of the day at 7:30pm in the Old Chapel.

 

Round Table & Sonnets, 2-5pm

Panel:
David Katz, Dept. of English, UMass Amherst
Adeline Mueller, Music Dept.-Musicology, Mt. Holyoke College
Nikoo Mamdoohi, Dept. of Theater, UMass Amherst
Roberta M. Marvin, Chair/Professor, Dept. of Music & Dance, UMass Amherst

Round Table:
Marie Roche, Mass. Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies
Joseph Summer, composer & Exec. Director of The Shakespeare Concerts
Benjamin Pesetsky, composer
Robert Eisenstein, Director of Five College Early Music Program
Adeline Mueller, Music Dept.-Musicology, Mt. Holyoke College
Milan Dragicevich, Dept. of Theater, UMass Amherst 

And students from the UMass Department of Theater

 

Concert, 7:30pm

"Summer's Distillation: A Liquid Prisoner Pent in Walls of Glass"

SchumannThree Songs for Voice & Harp, Op. 95
BrahmsFour Songs, Op. 17
Benjamin PesetskySonnet 147 and Our Remedies oft in ourselves do lie 
Joseph Summer: Settings of several Sonnets & O God that I were a man

Jessica Lennick & Jennifer Sgroe, soprano
Thea Lobo & Sophie Michaux, mezzo soprano
Neal Ferreira, tenor
Franzisca Huhn, harp
Kevin Owen & Josh Michal, horn
Tim Ribchester, music director
Joseph Summer, executive director

 

 

CFP New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.139  Friday, 3 April 2017

 

From:        Ray Siemens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2017 at 2:42:09 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans)

 

[Please redistribute / please excuse x-posting]

 

Call for Proposals: New Technologies and Renaissance Studies

RSA 2018, 22-24 March, New Orleans

 

Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America annual meetings have featured panels on the applications of new technology in scholarly research, publishing, and teaching.  Panels at the 2018 meeting will continue to explore the contributions made by new and emerging methodologies and the projects that employ them, both in-person at the conference and online via individual and group virtual presentations.

 

We welcome proposals for in-person and online papers, panels, and or poster / demonstration / workshop presentations on new technologies and their impact on research, teaching, publishing, and beyond, in the context of Renaissance Studies.  Examples of the many areas considered by members of our community can be found in the list of papers presented at the RSA since 2001 (http://bit.ly/1tn6rsd) and in those papers published thus far under the heading of New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (http://bit.ly/1zJiaqp). 

 

Please send proposals before 30 April 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, and a one-paragraph biographical CV, as well as an indication of whether you would consider or prefer an online presentation. We are pleased to be able to offer travel subventions on a competitive basis to graduate students who present on these panels; those wishing to be considered for a subvention should indicate this in their abstract submission.

 

We thank Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages & Renaissance (http://www.itergateway.org) for its generous sponsorship of this series and its related travel subventions since 2001.

 

 

 

New SBReview: Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.132  Thursday, 30 March 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        Thursday, March 30, 2017

Subject:    New SBReview: Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion.

 

[Editor’s Note: I am delighted to announce the publication of a review by Kelly A. Rivers of Pellissippi State Community College of Alisa Grant Ferguson’s Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion. All SBReviews are peer-reviewed and are archived at the SHAKSPER web site’s Scholarly Resources section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/book-reviews in book-quality PDF files.]

 

SBReview_28:

 

Ferguson, Alisa Grant. Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion. New York: Routledge, 2016. Xi +178 pp. $140.00. (ISBN-978 0 415 82300 5). 

 

Reviewed by Kelly A. Rivers 

Pellissippi State Community College 

 

SBReview_28:

 

          Ferguson, Alisa Grant. Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion. New York: Routledge, 2016. Xi +178 pp. $140.00. (ISBN-978 0 415 82300 5). 

 

Reviewed by Kelly A. Rivers

Pellissippi State Community College

 

At first glance, the title of this text calls to mind images of the mainstream understanding of “counter-culture”—hippies, radicals, and protestors. The subtitle’s use of inversion further strengthens a reader’s initial reaction by reiterating the idea of anti-mainstream culture. However, Alisa Grant Ferguson’s use of both counter-culture and inversion challenge any initial assumptions. In her text, Ferguson attempts to connect these terms to the idea of carnival—ala Bakhtin—so that the festival concept of social inversion (a topsy-turvy world where the elite are “dethroned” and replaced by the grotesque) influences the use and depiction of some of Shakespeare’s most popular plays.

 

Ferguson, a Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Literature at the University of Brighton, UK, focuses attention on films of the late post-modern, fin-de-siècle period. She positions her text as a response to the critical history of Shakespeare on film which overwhelmingly reflects “the romanticisation of the past” as well as the fervor for New Historicist and Cultural Materialist renderings of Shakespeare and his texts (xvi). Rather than standing with or against any particular theoretical approach, Ferguson attempts to “situate…[these] Shakespearean appropriations in a socio-cultural context” (xxiv). In particular, she draws attention to films that are, for the most part, outside of the conventional Shakespeare-on-film canon: The Filth and the Fury (2000, UK, dir. Julien Temple), My Own Private Idaho (1991, USA, dir. Gus Van Sant), Dogme#4: The King is Alive (2000, Sweden/Denmark, dir. Kristian Levring), Hamlet Liikemaailmassa (Hamlet Goes Business) (1987, Finland, dir. Aki Kaurismaki), Festen (The Celebration) (1998, Denmark, dir. Thomas Vinterberg), and Hamlet (2000, USA, dir. Michael Almereyda). On the whole, Ferguson examines these films to reveal the ways in which the directors appropriate Shakespeare (both the author and the playtext) as a way of overturning conventional or traditional perspectives of Shakespeare as a cultural hegemonic figure; instead, she concludes that these counter-culture appropriations use Shakespeare as “a tool to uncrown dominant ideologies” and, therefore, use “the Shakespearean texts themselves as a means by which to destablise the norms and apparatus of hegemonic authority, be that socio-cultural, canonical, or cinematic” (xiv). In other words, Ferguson argues that these films “reclaim” Shakespeare for his fringe culture appeal; they use his texts to change or invert the way we conceptually understand Shakespeare by injecting a sense of “play and festivity” (xiv).

 

Ferguson presents her argument in a series of case studies. Chapter One explores the documentary about the Sex Pistols, The Filth and the Fury, for its connection to and use of Richard III. Sections of this chapter explore the use of Laurence Olivier’s 1955 film as a way of connecting Johnny Rotten to Richard himself, the band’s anti-monarchy stance to Richard’s attempt to thwart traditional succession, and the band’s position on the margins of musical culture to Richard’s own marginality (13). Chapter Two examines the structure of My Own Private Idaho, which employs fragments of Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Parts I and II to predict Shakespeare’s future in the margins of cinema (he will not be the main figure; instead, pieces of his text will be used to evoke and provoke reactions from audiences). In particular, Ferguson observes that throughout My Own Private Idaho, the physical body is shown in fragments—disembodied parts—just as the texts of Henry IV, I and II are used in snatches rather than complete scenes or narration (55). The Dogme95 movement, which rejected mainstream (primarily Hollywood) methods of film design—especially special effects, props, and other artificially created elements, and the movement’s influence on The King is Alive serve as the basis for Chapter Three. This film (the fourth in the Dogme95 series) presents a vision of Shakespeare’s King Lear. Kristian Levring’s film, according to Ferguson, challenges the tenets of the Dogme95 Manifesto because Lear and Shakespeare “[appear] to emerge reborn but unscathed, … [but is] a somewhat conservative approach to appropriation and to Shakespeare’s enduring attraction” (58). 

 

The final chapter focuses on Hamlet and explores three films that “use [Hamlet] as a language of resistance and festive inversion” (87). Section one examines Hamlet Liikemaailmassa, or Hamlet Goes Business, as a parody film that mocks the film noir genre, the cultural capital of Shakespeare, and, most importantly, the authoritative structure of capitalism (95). Section two returns to the Dogme95 series and concentrates on the first film in the series, Festen, or The Celebration. This film, according to Ferguson, does not overtly use Shakespeare’s text but offers enough clues and references to the play that savvy viewers would see its connection to Hamlet (105). The final section covers the only “conventional” appropriation of Shakespeare, Michael Almereyda’s Hamlet (2000, USA). Ferguson examines the significance of the omission of the gravedigger scene and the inclusion of Halloween (and its cultural significance) as a replacement motif for it (126).

 

Overall, Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion offers readers an alternate way of approaching several intriguing films. The author displays thorough knowledge of existing critical conversations (about the films and the concepts of festivity and carnival) as she attempts to engage many of the critics who study these areas (especially in Chapter Four). The clearly defined and delineated chapters, as well as the expansive use of endnotes and outside sources, display careful consideration of both topic and audience. Any reader unfamiliar with the films can reasonably connect with the arguments. More than the others, chapters one and two call attention to aspects of the respective films that some viewers would not otherwise pause for and contemplate; these two chapters reveal avenues for discussion that could potentially generate fresh angles from which to view the films.

 

Unfortunately, these two chapters only suggest possible ways to see Shakespeare’s influence. In Chapter One, the description of Johnny Rotten as an appropriation of Richard III raises some eyebrows, but more than anything, it is to Olivier’s performance of Richard III rather than the Shakespeare’s character that this identity is linked. In addition, while the claims about Shakespeare’s disembodied presence in My Own Private Idaho appear as intriguing observations, the argument in this chapter is based upon extreme close-reading and theoretical application that, at times, seems unrealistic. On the whole, most of the observations made in Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture do nothing to connect the festival and carnival nature of Bahktin to the films. In fact, the major premise upon which the book’s argument is based—that these films speak to Shakespeare’s “fringe appeal”—fails to be proven. The identification of Shakespeare as a fringe figure is not discussed or explained; therefore, it cannot be proven conclusively. In fact, the existing tradition of Shakespeare scholarship—especially Shakespeare’s role in popular culture from the 1990s to the turn of the century—opposes Ferguson’s claim. If anything, the fringe aspect of her argument rests with the far-from-mainstream classification of most of the films she discusses. The films featured in the case studies fall outside the purview of casual scholars; the availability of foreign films (like the Dogme95 series) prove to be inaccessible to most students of Shakespeare. 

 

These issues are compounded by the lack of an overall conclusion; the book ends with the discussion of Hamlet (2000). While the introduction clearly states that the book is a series of case studies, the omission of a comprehensive conclusion results in a lack of closure or unity. As a result, Ferguson’s case study structure creates a fragmented argument—one without an established foundation or a discussion of the argument’s relevance. Due to the theoretical and critical nature of the book, a reader needs a well-developed final section that addresses how the ideas of playful inversion and festival appear in other films or how the study of Shakespeare-on-film benefits from this approach.

 

While not a text for the casual reader or for those unfamiliar with current Shakespearean criticism, foreign films, or critical theory, Shakespeare, Cinema, Counter-Culture: Appropriation and Inversion will appeal to scholars interested in case studies of these films and Shakespearean appropriation in late post-modern European cinema. For all others, this book requires a hefty dose of indulgence.

 

 

 

New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: The Biblical Name Shiloch as the Source for Shakespeare's Shylock

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.131  Thursday, 30 March 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, March 30, 2017

Subject:    New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: The Biblical Name Shiloch as the Source for Shakespeare's Shylock

 

As a service to its members, SHAKSPER makes selected papers for which the author would like comments available for a short time on the SHAKSPER server at the Scholarly Papers for Comments section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/scholarly-papers-for-comments

 

The following paper is currently available: The Biblical Name Shiloch as the Source for Shakespeare's Shylock ( 366 KB )  (Click on title to the left to download a pdf copy.)

 

New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: The Biblical Name Shiloch as the Source for Shakespeare's Shylock  By J.D. Markel 

 

The Merchant of Venice's Shylock bears a name of intriguing provenance. One often proffered biblical possibility derives from the name Shiloh in Genesis 49:10.  The King James Bible of 1611 renders this verse, "The scepter shall not depart from Iudah, nor a Law-giver from betweene his feete, untill Shiloh come: and unto him shall the gathering of the people be." Yet a different text published that very year  renders the verse, "...untill Shiloch come, & the people shall be gathered unto him." This "Shiloch" is easily visually audited as a homonym for Shylock. A Shiloh source for Shylock would be firmer if the former word had three enunciated consonants like the latter. Indeed, the previously mentioned "Shiloch" is not a typographical error, but an outcome of early modern Bible translation which owes just as much to Latin writings as to Hebrew. The spelling variations Shiloch and Shiloach were discussed in Shakespeare's day, and were an important religious topic given Genesis 49:10's prophetic and messianic semblances. But although the name Shylock derives from Bible, the instigation for Shakespeare to use such a name arises from his contemporary competition Christopher Marlowe. Marlowe, in his play The Jew of Venice, elected to name his main Jewish character Barabas, evoking the biblical personage Barabbas, whom Pontius Pilate pardoned over Jesus Christ. Shakespeare, in antithetical reaction to this Barabas, imbued his Jew with a Messianic appellation. The argument that Shakespeare's Merchant was in part an effort to "out do" Marlowe's Jew of Malta is a commonplace in critical literature. Indeed, my investigation of the name Shylock advances the same conclusion. But before elaboration on the dramatic and comic purposes of Shakespeare's intertextuality with Marlowe, I will the lay out the etymology of Shylock's name in isolation, in context with early modern understandings of Hebrew, and their interactions with the orthographies of Latin script languages and typographical practices. EndFragment

 

You should send your comments directly to the author by J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; or if you wish, you may start a thread through the normal SHAKSPER channels by sending it to the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.130  Thursday, 30 March 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, March 30, 2017

Subject:     New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

As a service to its members, SHAKSPER makes selected papers for which the author would like comments available for a short time on the SHAKSPER server at the Scholarly Papers for Comments section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/scholarly-papers-for-comments

 

The following paper is currently available: Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream ( 5.05 MB )  (Click on title to the left to download a pdf copy.)

 

New Scholarly Paper for Comments Available: Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream By J.D. Markel 

 

Oberon the Fairy King aims to play the mischievous matchmaker. To this end he instructs Robin Goodfellow to find a “little western flower,” (2.1.116) which he later calls “Cupid’s flower.” (4.1.72) Moisture from this flower applied to the eyelid of a sleeping person will cause her or him to fall madly in love with the first human or animal seen awake. Traditional scholarship identifies this flower as Viola tricolor, the Johnny-jump-up, a species known to Elizabethans as pansy and heartsease, among other names. However, almost everything the play says about this flower, from its color change to its aphrodisiacal power, points to a very different plant, Catananche caerulea. The catananche carries the name of the ancient aphrodisiac catanance, and many of its vernacular appellations are also love-linked like Cupid’s dart, cupidone, flor de cupido, and madre d’amore. Flowing from this examination of Midsummer’s flower I discovered the catananche is also the plant which springs from the blood of Adonis in Roman author Ovid’s epic Metamorphoses, but the corresponding blood-engendered flower in Shakespeare’s poem Venus and Adonis is, oddly enough, the Johnny-jump-up.

 

You should send your comments directly to the author by J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; or if you wish, you may start a thread through the normal SHAKSPER channels by sending it to the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

Announcements: Book and Podcast

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.127  Wednesday, 29 March 2017

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 28, 2017 at 4:37:48 PM EDT

Subject:    Announcements: Book and Podcast 

 

1. Neema Parvini’s first book Shakespeare’s History Plays: Rethinking Historicism (2012) is now available free of charge to the general public via Open Access: 

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2017/03/23/shakespeares-history-plays-rethinking-historicism-now-available-on-open-access/

 

2. Podcast: Shakespeare, Character, and Morality with James A. Knapp

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2017/03/23/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-35-shakespeare-character-and-morality-with-james-a-knapp/

 

Neema talks to James A. Knapp (Loyola University Chicago) about Shakespeare, Character, and Morality. Topics include the motivations of literary characters, emotions and human nature, ethics, and political bubbles.

 

 

 

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