Announcements

Shakespeare Operas: Watch MACBETH in English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.272  Tuesday, 17 October 2017

 

From:        Gene Tyburn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 15, 2017 at 12:18:34 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Operas: Watch MACBETH in English 

 

http://tyburnoperas.com

 

[Editor’s Note: The following is from the above web site. –Hardy]

 

It has been my desire for many years to make the world of opera more accessible to the American public. The opera, a four-hundred-year-old infatuation, is European born and integral to the life of many.

 

It has long been my dream to create opera works that would have popular appeal for Americans, thus I have created works from Shakespeare's plays that interested me the most and that I felt had the best opportunity to be good opera material.

 

It has always been a wonder to me that the greatest collection of literature in the world has no great opera successes based upon the works of Shakespeare. It is well documented that the Europeans have written many adaptations of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Macbeth, Antony & Cleopatra, and Othello.

 

These works seem to have a small modicum of success in Europe but these undisputed great works do not resonate with the American public over all. It is my opinion the fault lies in the fact that few of the composers created melodic arias for the main characters.

 

So the task as I see it has been left to me to adapt Shakespeare’s works into rhyming couplets and find composers who are inspired by my librettos to write lyrical, bel canto versions that will have a mass appeal for the English speaking public. I have used the best of the English language to make the works seem Shakespearian in tone, but use words that can be easily understood by the English-speaking public so there is immediate comprehension.

 

As of this date I have two works completed by a genius of opera composition, a Mr. Gerard Chiusano, and a whimsical composition of Iago by a marvelous composer, Mr. Flip Hayner. Newly added are several wonderful libretto adaptations from Chekhov now being perused for assignment. 

 

of this date I have two works completed by a genius of opera composition, a Mr. Gerard Chiusano, and a whimsical composition of Iago by a marvelous composer, Mr. Flip Hayner. Newly added are several wonderful libretto adaptations from Chekhov now being perused for assignment. 

 

I hope you enjoy the librettos and our attempt at exposing the English-speaking public to the marvelous world of opera.

 

Yours,

Gene Tyburn

 

To see a voice and piano version of Macbeth, go to YouTube and type TYBURNSMACBETH 

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.271  Tuesday, 17 October 2017

 

From:        Marianne L Novy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 13, 2017 at 1:48:08 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

 

https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/shakespeare-and-feminist-theory-9781472567079/

 

Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

By Marianne Novy

 

ISBN: 9781472567079

Imprint: The Arden Shakespeare

Series: Shakespeare and Theory

 

Are Shakespeare’s plays dramatizations of patriarchy or representations of assertive and eloquent women? Or are they sometimes both? And is it relevant, and if so how, that his women were first played by boys? This book shows how many kinds of feminist theory help analyze the dynamics of Shakespeare’s plays. Both feminist theory and the plays deal with issues such as likeness and difference between the sexes, the complexity of relationships between women, the liberating possibilities of desire, what marriage means and how much women can remake it, how women can use and expand their culture’s ideas of motherhood and of women’s work, and how women can have power through language. This lively exploration of these and related issues is an ideal introduction to the field of feminist readings of Shakespeare.

 

 

Table of contents:

 

1. Introduction 

2. Likeness and Difference

3. Desire

4. Marriage

5. Motherhood

6. Language

7. Between Women

8. Work

Bibliography

Index

 

 

 

CFP: Applying Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.270  Tuesday, 17 October 2017

 

From:        Robert Shaughnessy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 16, 2017 at 2:47:27 PM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers: Applying Shakespeare 

 

The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham 

Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance, University of Kent 

Guildford School of Acting, University of Surrey 

 

Applying Shakespeare

Call for Papers 

 

The Shakespeare Institute

Friday 9 March 2018 

 

Shakespeare’s work continues to occupy a unique position within contemporary education, performance and popular culture.  Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of performance forms, often in non-theatrical spaces and with an agenda of personal or social change. When these two fields combine, the results can be transformative for those involved. This is an opportunity for practitioners and scholars to come together to consider the uses of applied Shakespeare, sharing best practice and considering the efficacy and impact of new and existing projects. 

 

This one-day symposium considers how Shakespeare is used within applied theatre contexts.  We are inviting papers and contributions on Shakespeare’s relation to, for example: learning difficulties; diversity; disability arts; mental health; performance in custodial settings; therapeutic interventions; accessibility; social inclusion; pedagogy; relaxed performances; activism.

 

Confirmed speakers include Dr Sue Jennings (Dramatherapist), Phil Novis (Governor, HMP Leicester) Kelly Hunter (Artistic Director, Flute Theatre), and Ben Spiller (Artistic Director, 1623 Theatre).

 

Please send 250-word proposals to Rowan Mackenzie, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 18 December 2017. As well as 20-minute papers, we welcome contributions in a variety of formats, for example workshops, performance demonstrations, and posters. Please indicate clearly in your email the name of presenter(s), institutional affiliation(s) and email address(es). Proposers can expect to hear if their abstract has been accepted by 9 January 2018, and registration will open soon afterward. Any enquiries can be directed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

Conference Organisers: Rowan Mackenzie, The Shakespeare Institute, Nicola Shaughnessy, University of Kent, Robert Shaughnessy, University of Surrey

 

Robert Shaughnessy 

Director of Research 

Guildford School of Acting

University of Surrey 

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Steam-Driven Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.267  Friday, 13 October 2017

 

From:        Alan Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 12, 2017 at 4:47:47 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Steam-Driven Shakespeare

 

STEAM-DRIVEN SHAKESPEARE OR MAKING GOOD BOOKS CHEAP: FIVE VICTORIAN ILLUSTRATED EDITIONS.

Alan R. Young

  • New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2017.
  • 7.25 x 10.5 inches
  • cloth, dust jacket
  • 240 pages
  • ISBN: 9781584563594

Steam-Driven Shakespeare considers five major Victorian illustrated editions of Shakespeare, published by Charles Knight, Robert Tyas, George Routledge, John Cassell, and John Dicks between 1838 and 1869. These five publishers, all working in relatively close proximity to each other, dominated the Victorian market for illustrated editions of Shakespeare for some thirty years. Their success was dependent upon the introduction of steam-driven printing presses and paper-making machines, and other new technologies. 

 

The publishers’ innovative use of such resources enabled them to mass produce and distribute inexpensive books to an increasingly wide readership. The opening chapter of the book explores in some detail the alliance between Charles Knight and the printer William Clowes. Their pioneering experiments in using steam-driven printing to publish books illustrated with wood engravings laid the groundwork for a revolutionary change in the publishing of books and established the technological foundation upon which the four other publishers could build. 

 

Successive chapters, beginning with that on Charles Knight, show how each publisher, when adjusting to the technological changes, had to assemble a coordinated workforce (editors, compositors, proof readers, artists, engravers, printers) that could meet the deadlines imposed by the timetable of serial publication, the format used for the initial publication of all five editions.

 

The book explores the genesis of each edition, the ideological bent of each publisher, the makeup and workings of each publishing workforce, the format and pricing structure of each edition, its use of illustrations, and distribution systems. As the successive chapters reveal, the editions are very different from each other. Examining those differences reveals the range of ways publishing houses operated when employing new technologies.

 

Alan Young is Professor Emeritus of English at Acadia University. He has written extensively on English Renaissance literature, the literature of Atlantic Canada, and the reception of Shakespeare in the Victorian era.

 

 

 

CFP: Extended Deadline: BSA Shakespeare Studies Today

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.265  Thursday, 12 October 2017

 

From:        Douglas Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 10, 2017 at 9:27:18 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP: Extended Deadline: BSA Shakespeare Studies Today

 

Call for Papers: Extended Deadline 1 November 2017 

British Shakespeare Association: Shakespeare Studies Today

Queen’s University Belfast, 14-17 June 2018 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

 

 

Image from The Belfast Tempest (dir. Andrea Montgomery, 2016), Terra Nova Productions. Courtesy of 

Neil Harrison (models Sean Brown and Louise Parker).

 

Following on from the 2016 celebrations, the 2018 BSA conference offers an opportunity for academics, practitioners enthusiasts and teachers (primary, secondary and sixth- form teachers and college lecturers) to reflect upon Shakespeare Studies today. What does Shakespeare Studies mean in the here-and-now? What are the current and anticipated directions in such diverse fields of enquiry as Shakespeare and pedagogy, Shakespeare and race, Shakespeare and the body, Shakespeare and childhood, Shakespeare and religion, Shakespeare and economics, Shakespeare and the law, Shakespeare and emotion, Shakespeare and politics, Shakespeare and war and Shakespeare and the environment? What is Shakespeare’s place inside the curriculum and inside debates around theory, queer studies and feminism? Where are we in terms of editing and materiality, and where does Shakespeare sit alongside his contemporaries, male and female? How does theatre practice, performance history, adaptation, cinema and citation figure in ever evolving Shakespeare Studies? In particular, this conference is keen to explore the challenges facing Shakespeare Studies today and to reflect on newer emergent approaches. Reflections on past practices and their reinventions for the future are also warmly welcomed.

 

Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter), Prof. Clara Calvo (University of Murcia), Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Courtney Lehmann (University of the Pacific) and Prof. Ayanna Thompson (George Washington University). UK Premieres include: Veeram (dir. Jayaraj, 2016), a South Indian film adaptation of Macbeth, and Hermia and Helena (dir. Matías Piñeiro, 2016), an Argentine adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. BSA 2018 also includes: Q+As with theatre director Andrea Montgomery (The Belfast Tempest, 2016) and film directors Jayaraj and Matías Piñeiro. 

 

There are four ways to participate in BSA 2018:

 

1. Submit an abstract for a 20-minute paper. Abstracts (100 words) and a short biography to be submitted by 1 November 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

2. Submit a proposal for a panel session consisting of three 20-minute papers. Abstracts for all three papers (100 words each), a rationale for the panel (100 words) and short speaker biographies to be submitted by 1 November 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

3. Submit a proposal for a performance / practice or education workshop or a teachers’ INSET session. For a workshop, submit a summary proposal outlining aims and activities and a biographical statement. For an INSET session (either a one-hour event or a twenty-minute slot), submit a summary proposal and biographical statement. All proposals to be submitted by 1 November 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

4. Submit an abstract to join a seminar. The seminar format involves circulating a short paper in advance of the conference and then meeting to discuss all of the papers in Belfast. Abstracts (100 words), a short biography and a statement of your seminar of preference to be submitted by 1 November 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Seminars include: 

  • Digital Shakespeare: Histories/Resources/Methods’ led by Dr Stephen O’Neill (Maynooth University); 
  • Shakespeare and Act/Scene Division’ led by Dr Mark Hutchings (University of Reading);
  • ‘Shakespeare and the Book Today’ led by Prof. Emma Smith (Hertford College, Oxford);
  • ‘Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’ led by Dr Lucy Munro (King’s College, London);\
  • Shakespeare and Early Modern Playing Spaces’ led by Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast);
  • ‘Shakespeare and Europe’ led by Prof. Andrew Hiscock (Bangor University) and Prof. Natalie Vienne-Guerrin (University of Montpellier III-Paul Valéry);
  • Shakespeare and Film’ led by Dr Romano Mullin and Prof. Mark Thornton Burnett (Queen’s University Belfast);
  • ‘Shakespeare and Marx’ led by Dr Matt Williamson (Queen’s University Belfast);
  • ‘Shakespeare and Morality’ led by Dr Neema Parvini (University of Surrey);
  • ‘Shakespeare and Pedagogy’ led by Dr Linzy Brady (University of Sydney) and Dr Kate Flaherty (Australian National University);
  • ‘Shakespeare, Performance and the 21st Century’ led by Dr Erin Sullivan (Shakespeare Institute, the University of Birmingham);
  • ‘Shakespeare and Religion’ led by Dr Adrian Streete (University of Glasgow);
  • ‘Women, Shakespeare and Performance’, led by Prof. Liz Schafer (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Belfast is a popular destination and a wonderful city to visit. Conference-linked events will include Titanic Belfast. Optional tours will include the Giant’s Causeway and the locations used in the HBO series, Game of Thrones, which is filmed in Northern Ireland. Belfast is well-connected via two airports – Belfast International Airport and George Best Airport, Belfast. Belfast is also easily accessible by train, car or bus via Dublin International Airport. Discounted rates will be available at local hotels. A number of Postgraduate / Practitioner / Teacher Bursaries will be available to cover the conference fee. When you submit your abstract / proposal, please indicate if you would like to apply for one of these and if you would like to attend all of the conference or Saturday only.

 

Douglas Lanier

Fulbright Global Shakespeare Centre Distinguished Chair, 2016-2017

Department of English

University of New Hampshire

 

 

 

 

Collocations and N-grams - A New Resource

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.264  Thursday, 12 October 2017

 

From:        Pervez Rizvi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 8, 2017 at 11:47:57 AM EDT

Subject:    Collocations and N-grams - A New Resource

 

I would like to announce a new resource which I hope will be of value, particularly to people engaged in authorship attribution research.

 

Finding n-gram and collocation matches between plays is one of the techniques often used for authorship attribution. For those who don’t know, a matching n-gram is a phrase like ‘the story of my life’, which is found in both The Comedy of Errors and The Tempest. A collocation match is more general, the matching words being allowed to be in any order and have other words between them.

 

The usual method of finding matching n-grams and collocations is to do searches in LION and EEBO-TCP. This is largely a manual process and the time it takes can sometimes be prohibitively long. What is needed is a more industrial approach. Instead of repeatedly asking the computer to find given sets of words, we need to tell it how to recognize matching n-grams and collocations, and then tell it to find them all and list them.

 

Earlier this year I set myself the task of doing that. I have a set of more than 500 early modern plays and I have produced lists of matches for each one of them. N-gram matches are now completely listed and collocations are in progress, being done at the rate of several plays per week. With the milestone of listing all n-gram matches achieved, I am making the results freely available to download.

 

There should be many uses of these results. If you want to find verbal links between two plays, you can now open the results file for either of them and then filter on the other. For example, you could look at the matches for Act 1 of Titus Andronicus and filter to see how many n-grams and collocations they share with the plays of George Peele. Having found them, you can judge them in context rather than in isolation, by looking at results for other authors' plays for comparison. Counterexamples to rebut false authorship attributions should now be easier to find. With the number of n-gram matches being over 13 million, and millions more collocation matches to be added every week, there are opportunities for statistical analysis.

 

I hope you find this interesting. To learn more and to download the results, please visit my website: www.shakespearestext.com/can

 

 

 

The Container Globe: Update - Prototype in Detroit, MI

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.262  Thursday, 5 October 2017

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 4, 2017 at 11:32:47 AM EDT

Subject:    The Container Globe: Update - Prototype in Detroit, MI

 

The Container Globe

Shakespeare’s Globe theater, reimagined.

 

The Container Globe is a new performance space that’s also a moveable venue, based on Shakespeare’s original Globe, and built from repurposed shipping containers.

 

This Globe theater is a venue for modern theater, dance, rock n’ roll, or almost any kind of performing arts. The Globe can be configured to look like a glowing “Mad Max Thunderdome” for a rock show, or be set up like a classical theater for a Shakespeare play.

But primarily we see it as being a venue for presenting Shakespeare in a similar way to Shakespeare’s Globe in London and at open-air theaters around the world - i.e. as a “radical theatre experiment”, performing in the round, up-close and personal and open to the elements!


 

We have begun fabricating the first initial set of containers in Detroit, transforming the containers into the seating galleries that will form the ‘ring’ in front of the stage. 


 

These containers are part of a plan to build a prototype Globe on a site in Highland Park, MI (an enclave surrounded by Detroit) on the yard of an old school, that’s now an upcoming destination for the arts called ‘Galapagos’. The plan is to make the prototype Globe part of that venture.


 

We’re also putting together an education program associated with the Globe, because we feel that the educational benefits the Globe will bring are just as important as the performances that will happen there.

 


For more information: patronicity.com/globe

 

Thank you for your consideration, and please feel free to reach out to me personally at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have any questions or would like to discuss the project.

Sincerely,

Angus Vail

  

 

Patronicity.com/Globe

 

 

 

October Offerings from The Shakespeare Guild

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.261  Thursday, 5 October 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 2, 2017 at 7:19:17 PM EDT

Subject:    October Offerings from The Shakespeare Guild

 

A Conversation with Joanna Read,  

Who Oversees LAMDA, the London 

Academy of Music and Dramatic Art  

 

Friday, October 6, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

We’re delighted to launch the Guild’s 2017-18 Speaking of Shakespeare season with Joanna Read, the first woman to serve as Principal of the prestigious London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Before she arrived at LAMDA in 2010, Ms. Read distinguished herself as a director at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, the Edinburgh Festival Theatre, and the Young Vic. She has worked with such playwrights as William Nicholson (Shadowlands), and Howard Goodell and Melvyn Bragg (The Hired Man). Meahwhile she has orchestrated a major extension of LAMDA’s facilities and programs, drawing on support from such alumni as Jim Broadbent, Brian Cox, and Benedict Cumberbatch.   

 

 

An Evening with Peter Marks,  

An Influential Theater Critic 

With The Washington Post

 

Wednesday, October 18, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, New York

No Charge; Open to the Public

 

In 2002, after nine years with the New York Times, Peter Marks joined the Washington Post. He covers everything from Kennedy Center Honors galas to performances at Arena Stage (where Dear Evan Hansen began its route to a Tony Award), the Folger Theatre (where directors such as Aaron Posner garner Helen Hayes Awards), Ford's Theatre (which continues to attract Presidents), the Shakespeare Theatre Company (a favorite haunt for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg), and Signature Theatre (where Eric Schaefer has emerged as a leading interpreter of Sondheim musicals). Mr. Marks is also an influential voice about what is happening on Broadway and in London's West End.  

 

 

To learn more about Shakespeare Guild offerings, including this year’s Gielgud Award (to be presented to Sir David Hare at London’s Guildhall on Sunday, October 15) and a November 6 SOS program about Shakespeare Uncovered with WNET producer Stephen Segaller, visit www.shakesguild.org or email John F. Andrews (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

 

 

 

CFP: Teaching Shakespeare In and Beyond the Classroom

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.258  Monday, 25 September 2017

 

From:        Nicholas Helms <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 20, 2017 at 12:08:13 PM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers: Teaching Shakespeare In and Beyond the Classroom

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

TEACHING SHAKESPEARE IN AND BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

 

February 23rd and 24th, 2018

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

 

This conference invites papers that address teaching Shakespeare to non-English majors, whether those non-majors are students or member of local communities. We encourage papers from both academic and non-academic settings, including papers that consider dominant teaching philosophies and praxes currently in use in the university classroom and presentations considering various outreach programs. Papers may address any of the following:

  • Shakespeare and/or early modern drama in the general education college curriculum (literature, composition, theatre, education, etc.) and service classroom.
  • Shakespeare and/or early modern drama in detention and/or prison systems.
  • Shakespeare and/or early modern drama and adult community theatre and/or reading groups.
  • Shakespeare and/or early modern drama and children’s theatre and/or reading groups. 

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 1 November 2017

 

Since the primary goal of the conference is to foster a pragmatic learning experience, we are interested in receiving abstracts for traditional, individual papers (15-20 minutes) as well as complete panels, digital humanities projects, and workshops. Advanced graduate students and early career faculty are encouraged to participate.

 

All papers must contribute to our understanding how better to introduce Shakespeare to first-time readers and/or viewers. Submit a 300-350 word abstract and 2-page cv to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with the subject line “Abstract for Strode Conference” on or before 1 November 2017. 

 

As part of the conference, all participants will be invited to the Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa on the evening of February 23rd to screen the multi-award winning Still Dreaming, a recent documentary “about the powers of creativity, and how engaging in art-making can deeply enrich our lives at any age” that follows the production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at a retirement home. The filmmakers will be introducing their documentary and taking questions after the screening.

 

This conference is hosted by the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies and cosponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Alabama.

 

Questions should be directed via email to M. Tyler Sasser (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) & Nicholas Helms (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

 

Best,

Dr. Nicholas R. Helms

Instructor of English 

The Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies

The University of Alabama

 

 

 

SHAKESPEARE'S WOMEN at Fairleigh Dickenson University

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.256  Thursday, 14 September 2017

 

From:        Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 12, 2017 at 2:11:08 PM EDT

Subject:    SHAKESPEARE'S WOMEN at Fairleigh Dickenson University

 

The topic for the 2017 annual Shakespeare Colloquium at the Florham campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University is “Shakespeare’s Women.” The event will take place on Saturday, October 21 from 9:30-3:30 in Room S-11 (Sturchio Hall) in the Science Building. Sturchio Hall is handicap-accessible.

 

This will be the 25th year of these day-long Shakespeare gathering, which are free and open to the public.  New Jersey teachers are eligible for professional development hours for participating.  The Colloquium coordinator is Dr. Harry Keyishian, Professor Emeritus at Fairleigh Dickinson University. For further information, he may be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The program is supported by the Columbia University Seminar on Shakespeare.

 

At 9:30, Dr. Iska Alter, Professor Emerita from Hofstra University, will discuss “Shakespeare’s Historical Queens,” focusing on the powerful and eloquent women in the early history plays and Richard III. Dr. Alter’s writings on Shakespeare, the Yiddish theater, American drama and ethnic American literature have been published in such journals as Theatre History Studies, Shakespeare Survey, Modern Drama and Shakespeare Bulletin as well as a number of edited collections.

 

At 10:45 Dr. Denise A.Walen of Vassar College discusses “Shakespeare’s Disappearing Women,” focusing on how important female roles have been cut in production over the years, including Juliet, Queen Margaret, Desdemona and Princess Kate, among others. Dr. Walen has directed many stage productions, including Twelfth Night and As You Like It. Her research and teaching focuses on dramatic literature and theory, theater history and women’s studies. She is the author of Constructions of Female Homoeroticism in Early Modern Drama and has published in Shakespeare Quarterly, Shakespeare Survey, andTheatre Journal, among other journals and edited collections.

 

After a lunch break from Noon–1 p.m., Dr. Phyllis Rackin, Professor Emerita at the University of Pennsylvania, will speak about “Cleopatras: What They Mean and Why They Matter.” Dr. Rackin discusses Shakespeare’s Cleopatra as well as other versions, ranging from ancient historians to modern films. A former president of the Shakespeare Association of America, Dr. Rackin  is author of four books on Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s TragediesStages of History: Shakespeare’s English ChroniclesShakespeare and Women, and, with Dr. Jean E. Howard, Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare’s English Histories. She has published more than 30 articles on Shakespeare and related subjects. She was voted one of the 25 Master Teachers of Shakespeare in the last 125 years in a survey of Shakespeare scholars conducted at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

 

At 2:15–3:30 p.m., veteran actress Ellen Barry will perform and discuss some of her favorite Shakespearean women, including those she has performed, such as Lady Percy, Queens Constance and Hermione, and Helena, among others. Ellen Barry has played more than 100 classic and contemporary roles in New York and regional theaters, including Tennessee Williams’ Blanche, Stella and Hannah; Shakespeare’s Kate Percy, Hermione and Constance; Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Maude in Bakersfield Mist and Nat in Rabbit Hole; and both Lorraine and Meg in Sam Shepard’s A Lie of the Mind. As Ella in Ibsen’s John Gabriel Borkman she won an Off-Off Broadway Award, and for Vivian Bearing in Wit she received a Michigan Best Leading Actress award from the Detroit Free Press. Her one-woman show, Lizzie Borden at Eight O’Clock, has played at venues in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. She and her late husband, Paul Barry, founded the New Jersey Shakespeare Festival (now Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey).

 

Harry Keyishian

Professor Emeritus of English

Director Emeritus, FDU Press

Campus at Florham

Fairleigh Dickinson University

285 Madison Avenue, Madison.New Jersey 07940

 

 

 

Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.253  Friday, 8 September 2017

 

From:        Paul Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 8, 2017 at 7:06:02 AM EDT

Subject:    Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time CFP

 

CFP: A Special Issue of the Journal Shakespeare on ‘Theatre People of Shakespeare’s Time’

 

2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Richard Burbage, a member of the family who gave us the first purpose-built theatre in Shakespeare’s London. By exploring his life, and those around him, historians have been able to unearth much valuable information about the early modern theatre industry. Scholarship about other theatre people – prompted by their work, the archive, or both – has similarly added to our knowledge of the theatre in Shakespeare’s time. We have learnt about the period’s theatre from Philip Henslowe’s diary, Anthony Munday’s pageants, Richard Brome’s contract, and George Wilkins’ lawsuits. Though biography, according to George Eliot, is ‘a disease of English literature’, there is plenty to gain from considering some aspect of the lived experience of those involved in the theatre. With that in mind, this special issue of Shakespeare seeks submissions relating to theatre people of Shakespeare’s time. 

 

Papers might tackle (but are not limited to):

 

- A study of a theatre person’s life

 

- Some aspect of a theatre person's life, be it an appearance in the documentary record, a life event, or a temporal slice of their biography (per James Shapiro in 1599 and 1606)

 

- The relationships of a given theatre person or theatre people to one another

- The relationship of theatre people to events, persons, or places beyond the theatre industry

 

- Ignored or overlooked figures in the period's theatre 

 

- The relationships between theatre-connected institutions (such as playing companies, the court, the Stationers' Company) and how these affected particular theatre people

 

- How theatre people wielded and/or experienced the power of what E. K. Chambers called the ‘Forces of Control’

 

- A study of the biographical intersections of two or more theatre persons’ lives

 

- What theatre-biography tells us about play-authorship

 

- The during-life and/or posthumous reputations of particular early modern theatre people

 

Submissions (in the range of 5,000-9,000 words) are due by 1 March 2018. Fully‑anonymised typescripts should be sent to Paul Brown This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. All contributions will be peer-reviewed by two independent readers prior to acceptance. 

 

Best,

Paul

 

Lecturer in English

De Montfort University

Leicester, UK.

 

 

 

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