Announcements

Peter Milward

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.233  Sunday, 20 August 2017

 

From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 19, 2017 at 10:21:17 AM EDT

Subject:    Peter Milward

 

Fr. Peter Milward, the great pioneer of Shakespeare and Catholicism studies, has died.  His work was the basis of the ‘Catholic’ turn later taken by Greenblatt, Gary Taylor, and so many others. The current TV series, “Will,” whatever its merits, can now assume the plausibility of the Catholic context because of the kind of work Milward did.  I hope to see a more adequate notice.

 

Dennis Taylor

President Emeritus 

BCARF (Boston College Association of Retired Faculty)

 

 

 

SHAKSPER’s Future

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.231  Friday, 18 August 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, August 18, 2017

Subject:   SHAKSPER’s Future

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

No one has stepped up to be trained to take my mantle when I am away or decided to no longer be SHAKSPER’s editor, moderator, owner.

 

I thought about announcing mine or SHAKSPER’s death as Louis Marder did on Shakespeare Newsletter, but I am too introverted to do something like that.

 

So, I will keep on as long as I am able or until someone expresses a wish to be trained to edit SHAKSPER.

 

Faithfully yours,

Hardy

 

 

 

GWU Annual Shakespeare Lecture with Dr. Jonathan Hope (9/8/17)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.230  Friday, 18 August 2017

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 18, 2017 at 2:50:12 PM EDT

Subject:    GWU Annual Shakespeare Lecture with Dr. Jonathan Hope (9/8/17)

 

Please join us as we celebrate the start of the academic school year with our sixth Annual Shakespeare Lecture and reception. The event is free and open to the public; all are welcome!

 

The George Washington University’s Medieval & Early Modern Studies Institute's 

Annual Shakespeare Lecture and reception with Dr. Jonathan Hope

 

Friday, September 8th

4-5:30 pm

Post Hall 

GWU's Mount Vernon Campus

Free and open to the public; free shuttle to Mount Vernon campus (more information available here)

 

"Monstrous Devices or Shakespeare Machines? Can computers read Hamlet for you?"

 

In this talk, Professor Hope will explore how computers, digital texts, data visualization, and statistics are changing the ways we read Shakespeare. In it, Professor Hope takes up questions like: How are Shakespeare's plays different if we convert them into bags of words instead of books of pages or speeches on stages? What if we count the words instead of reading them? What if machines allow us to read everything his contemporaries printed at the same time we read Shakespeare? In doing so, Professor Hope shows how readily available tools can provide an "in" to texts that might surprise your professors and reveal how everything people tell you about Shakespeare's inventive vocabulary is wrong. Using these tools we'll see instead how surprisingly average Shakespeare turns out to be. 

 

Dr. Jonathan Hope is a professor at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland and a contributor to the Mellon-funded, interdisciplinary project Visualizing English Print. He is the author of numerous books, including Shakespeare and Language: (Arden 2010), Shakespeare's Grammar (Arden 2003), and The Authorship of Shakespeare's Plays (Cambridge UP 1994). His teaching and research focuses on the intersection of language and literature: he uses techniques from linguistics to explore literary texts as evidence for the linguistic history of English. 

Generously sponsored by GWU’s Medieval & Early Modern Studies Institute 
For more information contact: Holly Dugan, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

GW MEMSI

The Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute of the George Washington University

www.gwmemsi.com

 

 

 

Registration open for the GIAN course entitled "Poetry and Visual Culture", 12-16 October 2017 at NIT Durgapur, West Bengal, India

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.229  Friday, 18 August 2017

 

From:        Sri Krishan Rai <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 18, 2017 at 1:04:16 PM EDT

Subject:    Registration open for the GIAN course entitled "Poetry and Visual Culture", 12-16 October 2017 at NIT Durgapur, West Bengal, India

 

Dear Colleague,

 

This is to inform you that under the GIAN program of MHRD, GOI, a course entitled “Poetry and Visual Culture” is going to be organised at National Institute of Technology Durgapur from 12-16 October 2017. 

 

The brochure is attached for the detailed information. Kindly note that the registration for the event is open for UG/PG/PhD students as well as faculty members having an interest in the subject matter. All courses are designed in a manner that does not require the participant to have any prior background in the subject to allow people of diverse background to come and learn. 

 

An important thing to note regarding the registration for any GIAN programme is that you can only register for the events by creating a login in the GIAN website (http://www.gian.iitkgp.ac.in/GREGN) and not by requesting the course coordinator.The registration on GIAN is a one-time affair, i.e. once you are registered on GIAN portal you may apply for any GIAN course. 

 

After registration, follow the following steps:

1. Tick the course of your choice from the ''upcoming events''. 

2. Save the course.

3. click the Confirm the course.

 

[Check the check boxes and click 'Save' button to register for the new course. You need to click 'Confirm Courses' for confirmation. ]

 

For further assistance, you may feel free to contact me.

 

 

Thanking you.

 

P.S. The last Date of applying for the course is 20 September 2017.

 

With profound regards

Course Coordinator

Dr Shri Krishan Rai

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

National Institute of Technology Durgapur

MG Avenue Durgapur (WB) India

Pin 713209

09434788019 (M), 0343-2753482 (R)

email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Poetry & Visual Culture 

........................................................................................................................................... 

Overview 

The teaching and learning of poetry involve a quest for the comprehension of the communicative techniques used in the production of the poem. In a sense, the consumption of the poem is an unpacking process, a dismantling of the architecture of the poem and recreating it mentally. In this reconstruction, the reality of the poem as a signifying practice emerges clearly. Learners need to be made familiar with the various semiotic possibilities built into the poem – whether suggested by the linguistic text or used in complementing it. The semiotic forms may be associated with sounds, sight, smell, touch, and taste. This workshop is concerned with the semiotics of sight, as well as its intersections with sound (the sight of sound) in poetry, especially as experienced in the context of Information Technology.  

 

The conservative teaching of the poem as a mere frozen linguistic text does not enhance the comprehension of how the concept of poetry itself has been changing in the context experimentations with image and action in the age of Information Technology. Visual culture in a computerized world brings with it a different kind of knowledge, different kind of philosophy of teaching, and articulation of the world, even as a poem.  

 

Students and their teachers need to be familiar with the ways that Information Technology has brought about changes in the ontology of visual poetry. Indeed, the implications of the ancient Chinese saying, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” are manifest in the visual construction of poems and various manipulations of the image with software. As poets engage with computer literacy and cyberacy skills, learners and teachers, too, are invited to a new context of the learning and analysis of the poem, making the teaching and learning of the art form linked clearly to changes in its communication media.  

 

 

Dates 

 October 12-16, 2017. 

Number of participants for the course will be limited to fifty. 

 

Modules 

  

A: Conceptual Issues: Poetry, Poetic Text, Visuality, Visual Culture, Visual Rhetoric, Style, Technologized Visual Culture, Animation, Narration, Adaptation. 

 

B: Forms of Visual Poetry – Still-life (photographic, drawing/painting, installations, etc); Mimes, dance/choreographic texts (e.g. Josef Biro’s visual poetic texts), Animated visual poetry (with & without sound), Visualized linguistic text (word art & games) 

 

Tutorial 1:  A discussion on the necessity of the visual in the poem and the changing modes  of visuality in poetic communication. Examples from Indian poetry. 

 

C : Visuality, Iconicity, and the Reading of the Poetic: A perspective from Semiotics. 

 

D: The Sight of Sound: Interfaces of Visuality and Sound in Poetry 

 

Tutorial 2: A discussion of samples of poems with sounds that suggest visual states and  processes. Samples from Alan Sondheim’s productions. 

 

E : Visual Poetry in the age of IT (A): Animations and video poems, and adaptations. 

 

F: Visual Poetry in the Age of IT (B): Dance, Painting, and Digital Images as Poems  

 

Tutorial 3: Detailed discussion of examples from various traditions, practices, and  orientations in animated/video poetry, dance poetry (poetry of the dancing body),   etc. 

 

G: Style in Visual Poetry: the contextual variables 

 

 H: Style in Visual Poetry: Explorations of the manipulations of codes 

 

Tutorial 4: Detailed discussion of linguistic, sound, and visual elements used in Chuma Nwokolo’s “Sudan, Sudan” 

 

I : Visual Poetry and Changing Skills in the Production & Consumption of Poetry 

 

J: The Teaching of Visuality in Poetry: Challenges & Imperatives 

 

Tutorial 5: A discussion of pedagogical issues that arise in visual poetry education,  

 especially in teaching poems from the foreign context.  

 

K:  The Production of Various Forms of Still-life Visual Poems 

 

L: The Production of Video Poems  

 

Tutorial 6: Practical session on the production of various forms of visual poems. 

 

You Should Attend If… 

 . You are a Literature student, in need of insights on the intersection of poetry and visual communication, especially in the context of the New Media; 

 

. You teach literature and would like to enhance your teaching strategies in handling the multimodal dimensions in contemporary poetry, particularly the visual;  

 

. You are a practising poet wishing to be abreast with emerging practices in engaging the visual;  

 

. You are a culture worker, challenged by your profession to explain or promote knowledge in poetic representation; 

 

.  You are a curriculum designer and wish to understand further how visual poetic material could be handled in the teaching of poetry; 

 

. You are a computer scientist looking for richer understanding of the poetic genre, particular those involving visual data and looking for inspiration on how to handle them in your analysis; or  

 

. You are just a literary critic, skeptical about the handling of poetic visuality in literary analysis.  

 

 

Fees 

  The participation fees for taking the course is as follows:  

..Participants from abroad : US $200 

..Students(UG/PG): Rs.1500  

..Research scholars(M Phil/DPhil/PhD): Rs.2500  

..Faculty/others (Academic Institutions): 3500  

..Participants from Industry: Rs.4000..

The above fee is towards participation in the course, all instructional materials, lunch, tea and snacks etc. Accommodation and the travel expenses should be paid by the participants. Accommodation in the guest house may be provided on a space available basis with early reservation.  

Mode of payment: Please contact the Course Co-ordinator.  

 

The Faculty 

 

Course Co-ordinator 

Dr. Shri Krishan Rai  

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences  

National Institute of Technology Durgapur  

Durgapur, WB, India.  

PIN 713209  

Phone: 0343-2753482  

M. 9434788019  

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

www.nitdgp.ac.in 

 

Obododimma Oha is a Professor of Stylistics and Cultural Semiotics in the Department of English, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He has taught in universities in Namibia and Senegal, apart from Nigeria, where he currently teaches Stylistics, Semiotics, and Literature and the New Media in the Dept. of English. He also teaches Disaster Semiotics in the Institute for Peace & Strategic Studies, University of Ibadan. Oha is a poet with strong interest in IT and a regular blogger on culture and signification. 

 

Dr. Shri Krishan Rai is an Assistant Professor at Department of Humanities and Social Sciences of National Institute of Technology Durgapur, WB, India. He has got three books and a score of research papers to his credit to date. His current interests include cinema, religion, and contemporary theories. 

 

 

 

New Titles -- Arden Shakespeare & Theory Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.228  Friday, 18 August 2017

 

From:        Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 17, 2017 at 3:10:40 PM EDT

Subject:    New Titles -- Arden Shakespeare & Theory Series

 

Dear Fellow SHAKSPER Members, 

 

I’m pleased to announce the upcoming publication of the next 2 titles in the Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series --  

 

http://bloomsbury.com/uk/series/shakespeare-and-theory/ 

 

Marlow, Christopher. Shakespeare and Cultural Materialist Theory. Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series. London: Arden Shakespeare/Bloomsbury, 24 Aug. 2017. ISBN 9781472572967 

 

https://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-cultural-materialist-theory-9781472572967/

 

Novy, Marianne. Shakespeare and Feminist Theory. Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series. London: Arden Shakespeare/Bloomsbury, 21 Sept. 2017. ISBN 9781472567079

 

https://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-feminist-theory-9781472567079/

 

These titles are currently available for pre-order.  If you would order them for your campus library and consider ordering them for your courses, your students, and yourselves, I would be grateful.   

 

FYI, podcast Interviews with Series authors are accessible at http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/ (podcast interviews #21 - #32).  

 

All the best,

Evelyn Gajowski, Series Editor

Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series

 

 

 

John Donne and Baroque Allegory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.227  Saturday, 12 August 2017

 

From:        Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 11, 2017 at 11:39:11 AM EDT

Subject:    John Donne and Baroque Allegory

 

I’m pleased to announce the official publication of my new book from Cambridge University Press, John Donne and Baroque Allegory: The Aesthetics of Fragmentation.  A link follows. www.cambridge.org/9781107195806<http://www.cambridge.org/9781107195806>

 

While it is indeed about Donne and how Walter Benjamin’s ideas about allegory can illuminate reading his poetry, I think many Shakespeareans will find it interesting as well!

 

All best,

Hugh Grady

 

 

 

'Shakespeare at Play' (ANZSA Conference)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.226  Saturday, 12 August 2017

 

From:        David McInnis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 9, 2017 at 3:07:50 AM EDT

Subject:    'Shakespeare at Play' (ANZSA Conference)

 

**CFP Extended: 04 September**

 

The convenors of the 2018 ANZSA conference, ‘Shakespeare at Play’, are extending the Call for Papers until Monday 04 September 2017.

 

Many of our friends in the northern hemisphere in particular are travelling for research during their summer, and some have asked for more time to submit abstracts for consideration. By extending the CFP to accommodate these colleagues, we also welcome late submissions from anyone closer to home (ANZ) who may still be wishing to present a paper.

 

‘Shakespeare at Play’ 

ANZSA 2018 

The University of Melbourne 

8-10 February 2018 

 

http://conference.anzsa.org/ 

 

Confirmed keynotes: 

 

Gina Bloom, UC Davis 

Claire M. L. Bourne, Penn State U 

Roslyn L. Knutson, U Arkansas, Little Rock 

 

20 minute papers are now invited for the Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (ANZSA) biennial conference. Papers might consider (but are not restricted to) these or any related topics: 

 

plays 

players 

swordplay 

early modern plays 

Shakespeare in plays 

playfulness 

playwriting 

play on words 

play-based learning 

playing tricks 

playwrights 

playbooks 

playback theatre 

Melbourne: capital of cultural and sporting play 

improvisational play 

getting played 

game-play 

 

Inquiries and proposals (200 words + 50 word bio) should be sent to David McInnis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by Monday 04 September 2017. 

 

Organising Committee: 

 

Gayle Allan, Deputy Dean, Trinity College, University of Melbourne 

 

Rob Conkie, Senior Lecturer – Theatre and Drama, La Trobe University 

 

David McInnis, Gerry Higgins Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies, University of Melbourne 

 

Paul Salzman, Emeritus Professor of English Literature, La Trobe University

 

 

David McInnis | @dnmcinnis

Gerry Higgins Senior Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies

English and Theatre, University of Melbourne

 

Co-Editor, Lost Plays Database

www.lostplays.org

 

 

 

Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama: Beyond Authorship

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.225  Saturday, 12 August 2017

 

From:        Brett Greatley-Hirsch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 8, 2017 at 5:51:46 AM EDT

Subject:    Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama: Beyond Authorship

 

Dear SHAKSPERians,

 

I’m delighted to announce that Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama: Beyond Authorship has just been published by Cambridge University Press.

 

http://www.cambridge.org/9781107191013

 

Hugh Craig and Brett Greatley-Hirsch extend the computational analysis introduced in Shakespeare, Computers, and the Mystery of Authorship (edited by Hugh Craig and Arthur F. Kinney; Cambridge, 2009) beyond problems of authorship attribution to address broader issues of literary history. Using new methods to answer long-standing questions and challenge traditional assumptions about the underlying patterns and contrasts in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama sheds light on, for example, different linguistic usages between plays written in verse and prose, company styles and different character types. As a shift from a canonical survey to a corpus-based literary history founded on a statistical analysis of language, this book represents a fundamentally new approach to the study of English Renaissance literature and proposes a new model and rationale for future computational scholarship in early modern literary studies. 

 

“This is an outstanding book of major importance to the field of Shakespeare studies specifically and to the wider field of literary studies in general. As well as conveying new knowledge of exceptional interest, it is written in a style that makes it comprehensible by a wide, non-specialist readership. I anticipate that it will generate intense interest, not least because it debunks a series of current myths about authorship and the style of drama in Shakespeare’s time, and introduces new methods of literary criticism.” – Gabriel Egan, De Montfort University

 

Best wishes,

Brett 

 

School of English

University of Leeds

Coordinating Editor, Digital Renaissance Editions

Co-editor, Shakespeare (Routledge)

www.notwithoutmustard.net

 

New from Cambridge University Press:

Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama: Beyond Authorship

Hugh Craig and Brett Greatley-Hirsch

http://www.cambridge.org/9781107191013

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.223  Tuesday, 1 August 2017

 

From:        Matteo A Pangallo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 31, 2017 at 3:35:39 PM EDT

Subject:    Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater

 

I’m excited to share the news that my book on amateur playwrights in Shakespeare’s theater is now available from Penn Press. SHAKSPER subscribers can use the promo code PH89 to get a 20% discount when ordering it from the Penn Press website.

 

Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater 
Matteo A. Pangallo

 

“An extremely substantial contribution to the field. Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater has the potential to reconfigure current debates about theatrical authorship and spectatorship, and it also acts as an invaluable primer on a range of neglected material.”—Lucy Munro, King’s College London

 

Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater shows how the rise of England’s first commercialized culture industry also gave rise to the first generation of participatory consumers and their attempts to engage with mainstream culture by writing early modern “fan fiction.”

 

Full Description, Table of Contents, and More

 

256 pages | 6 x 9 
Hardcover | ISBN 978-0-8122-4941-5 | $59.95s | £50.00 
Ebook | ISBN 978-0-8122-9425-5 | $59.95s | £39.00

 

 

Among the dramatists who wrote for the professional playhouses of early modern London was a small group of writers who were neither members of the commercial theater industry writing to make a living nor aristocratic amateurs dipping their toes in theatrical waters for social or political prestige. Instead, they were largely working- and middle-class amateurs who had learned most of what they knew about drama from being members of the audience.

 

Using a range of familiar and lesser-known print and manuscript plays, as well as literary accounts and documentary evidence, Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare's Theatershows how these playgoers wrote and revised to address what they assumed to be the needs of actors, readers, and the Master of the Revels; how they understood playhouse materials and practices; and how they crafted poetry for theatrical effects. The book also situates them in the context of the period's concepts of, and attitudes toward, playgoers' participation in the activity of playmaking.

 

Plays by playgoers such as the rogue East India Company clerk Walter Mountfort or the highwayman John Clavell invite us into the creative imaginations of spectators, revealing what certain audience members wanted to see and how they thought actors might stage it. By reading Shakespeare’s theater through these playgoers’ works, Matteo Pangallo contributes a new category of evidence to our understanding of the relationships between the early modern stage, its plays, and its audiences. More broadly, he shows how the rise of England’s first commercialized culture industry also gave rise to the first generation of participatory consumers and their attempts to engage with mainstream culture by writing early modern “fan fiction.”

 

Matteo Pangallo

Department of English

Virginia Commonwealth University

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Site: https://vcu.academia.edu/MatteoPangallo

Book: http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15742.html

  

 

 

Asian Shakespeare Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.222  Monday, 31 July 2017

 

From:        ASA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 30, 2017 at 4:01:38 AM EDT

Subject:    Asian Shakespeare Association Conference Calls for Papers (Manila, 28-30 May 2018)

 

Dear Friends in Shakespeare,

 

Please help spread the word to colleagues, students, and members of your associations. 

 

“Shakespeare, Traffics, Tropics: The Third Conference of the Asian Shakespeare Association,” to be held in Manila, 28-30 May 2018, is now accepting abstracts and seminar proposals. Co-organized by Ricardo Abad and Judy Celine Ick and jointly hosted by Ateneo de Manila University and the University of Philippines Diliman, the conference features keynote speaker Peter Holland and 3 exciting live performances by local and international artists. See the attached call for papers for more detail. The deadline for submission is 15 September 2017. There will be another call for seminar participation, to be announced in the fall issue of the Asian Shakespeare Newsletter.

 

Organized by Yoshihara Yukari, the Graphic Shakespeare Competition has inspired excellent artwork, showcasing various styles. A sampling of the First Competition can be found here. The Second Competition is now accepting entries from all artists, illustrators, designers and art students. Please see the attached for submission detail, and forward it to those who may be interested. The deadline for submission is 31 December 2017. An exhibit as well as the award ceremony will take place at the 2018 ASA conference. 

 

Please visit the ASA website for updates. We look forward to your participation!

 

Sincerely,

Bi-qi Beatrice Lei

Chair of the Executive Committee

Asian Shakespeare Association

 

PDF: Second Graphic Shakespeare Competition    pdf 2nd Graphic Shakespeare Competition call for participation 0626 (2.78 MB)

 

PDF: “Shakespeare, Traffics, Tropics: The Third Conference of the Asian Shakespeare Association”   pdf ASA2018 cfp (167 KB)

 

 

 

Retiring as Director of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.221  Monday, 31 July 2017

 

From:        Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 29, 2017 at 9:05:44 PM EDT

Subject:    Retiring as Director of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

 

I am writing to announce that I am retiring as director of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. The new director, James Gifford, is associate professor of English at the university’s campus in Vancouver. He may be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We continue our co-publishing partnership with Rowman & Littlefield, established in 2010.  

 

We publish the annual journals Shakespeare Studies (edited by James R. Siemon and Diana E. Henderson) and Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England (edited by Susan P. Cerasano), through a special arrangement with Associated University Presses, our publishing partners from 1967-2010.  

 

Through Rowman & Littlefield, we publish edited collections of papers given at the Blackfriars Conference, organized semi-annually by the American Shakespeare Theatre in Staunton, VA and devoted to issues of early modern staging. 

 

We publish the book series Shakespeare and the Stage, edited by Matthew Kozusko and Peter Kanelos, featuring books on the theatrical dimensions of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries (and welcoming both individual studies and collections of previously unpublished essays).

 

The list of Shakespearean scholars whose books we have published includes Stephen Booth, James C. Bulman, Sean Benson, Nancy Mohrlock Bunker, Joseph Candido, Walter W. Cannon, Joseph Candido, Maurice Charney, Monica Matei-Chesnoiu, Sid Homan, Travis Curtright, Sarah Enloe, R. W. Desai, Louise Geddes, Sarah Hatchuel, James Hirsh, Kristine Johanson, Matthew Kendrick, John Klause, Bernice Kliman, Inge Leimberg, Richard Levin, Catherine Loomis, James P. Lusardi, Cary M. Mazer, Kathryn McPherson, Mark Jay Minsky, Kathryn Moncrief, Barbara A. Murray, Frank Occhiogrosso, Geoffrey S. Proehl, Sid Ray, Robert Sawyer, Rick J. Santos, June Schlueter, B. J. Sokol, Ekaterina Sukhanova, Nancy Taylor, Virginia Mason Vaughan, Allyna Ward, R. S. White, and Robert Willson, Jr.  

 

In short, we have a proud history in Shakespeare Studies. If you have a manuscript or a proposal you would like us to consider, please contact Dr. James Giffordat This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. My thanks to all who have made my forty years as director of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press so rewarding. 

 

Harry Keyishian

Professor Emeritus of English

Fairleigh Dickinson University

 

 

 

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