Announcements

CfP - The 2018 IASEMS Shakespeare Graduate Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.215  Wednesday, 26 July 2017

 

From:        Ilaria Natali <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 25, 2017 at 11:03:15 AM EDT

Subject:    CfP - The 2018 IASEMS Shakespeare Graduate Conference

 

Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

The IASEMS Graduate Conference at the British Institute of Florence

 

CONVERSIONS IN EARLY MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Florence, 20 April 2018

 

The 2018 IASEMS Graduate Conference at The British Institute of Florence is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference will focus on the theme of conversion, a fascinating phenomenon, a promise of newness that blends elements of individual experience with larger problems of historical change.

 

The ideological and spiritual life of early modern Britain finds a special interpretative key in the notion of conversion, whether perceived as an individual response to a religious and political challenge, a community reaction to political upheaval, or a social change brought about by the innovations of modernity.

 

The goal of this Conference is to develop an understanding of conversion that will address epistemological, psychological, political, spiritual and technological kinds of transformation, perceived both as subjective and collective change. Therefore conversion is to be understood in its broadest possible sense, and nor merely as a religious phenomenon. 

 

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

 

- forms of conversion, sacred and secular, i.e., awakening to a new faith, an intensification of existing beliefs, an embracing of a (radical) political movement, etc.

 

- conversional thinking and practice

 

- early modern textual ‘conversions’, i.e., from manuscript to print, from one format to another, from one genre to another

 

- relationships among transformation, freedom and power

 

- forms of religious dissent in early modern British culture

 

- religious change and gender 

 

- how early modern English theatre and other theatrical practices represent, adopt, transform, relocate forms of conversion

 

- conversion narratives

 

- the phenomenon of forced conversion

 

- authenticity and pretense in conversion

 

- religious conversion as catalyst of other transformations (e.g., translation, alchemy, enthusiasm, etc.)

 

- technologies of transformation

 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:

 

- the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography;

 

- abstracts are to be submitted by Sunday 29 October 2017 by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;

 

- all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2017;

 

- each finished contribution should not exceed 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can give their papers in Italian);

 

- Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker

 

- participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper ten days before the Conference. 

 

Selected speakers who are IASEMS members can apply for a small grant

(http://www.maldura.unipd.it/iasems/iasems_about.html)

 

For further information please contact Ilaria Natali

(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

 

 

BSA Bulletin - July / August 2017

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.211  Tuesday, 25 July 2017

 

From:        British Shakespeare Association <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 24, 2017 at 6:58:59 PM EDT

Subject:    BSA Bulletin - July / August 2017

 

The BSA Bulletin — July-August 2017

 

NEWS FROM THE TRUSTEES

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: British Shakespeare Association annual conference: Shakespeare Studies Today, Queen’s University Belfast, 14-17 June 2018 

 

Shakespeare Studies is one of the most rich and dynamic areas of interdisciplinary enquiry. It embraces historical explorations of Shakespeare’s canon, ranges across four hundred years of world theatre and performance history, and is continually renewed by Shakespeare’s iconic status in contemporary culture, film and media. Shakespeare draws together academics, teachers, theatre professionals, practitioners, readers and enthusiasts. At the same time, Shakespeare is a global commodity, reinvented in every culture and nation, meaning that his work prompts world-wide conversation. Following on from the 2016 celebrations, the 2018 BSA conference offers an opportunity for academics, practitioners enthusiasts and teachers (primary, secondary and sixth- form teachers and college lecturers) to reflect upon Shakespeare Studies today. Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter), Prof. Clara Calvo (University of Murcia), Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Courtney Lehmann (University of the Pacific) and Prof. Ayanna Thompson (George Washington University). UK Premieres include: Veeram (dir. Jayaraj, 2016), a South Indian film adaptation of Macbeth, and Hermia and Helena (dir. Matías Piñeiro, 2016), an Argentine adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. BSA 2018 also includes: Q+As with theatre director Andrea Montgomery (The Belfast Tempest, 2016) and film directors Jayaraj and Matías Piñeiro. 

 

There are four ways to participate in BSA 2018:

 

1. Submit an abstract for a 20-minute paper. Abstracts (100 words) and a short biography to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2. Submit a proposal for a panel session consisting of three 20-minute papers. Abstracts for all three papers (100 words each), a rationale for the panel (100 words) and short speaker biographies to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

3. Submit a proposal for a performance / practice or education workshop or a teachers’ INSET session. For a workshop, submit a summary proposal outlining aims and activities and a biographical statement. For an INSET session (either a one-hour event or a twenty-minute slot), submit a summary proposal and biographical statement. All proposals to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

4. Submit an abstract to join a seminar. The seminar format involves circulating a short paper in advance of the conference and then meeting to discuss all of the papers in Belfast. Abstracts (100 words), a short biography and a statement of your seminar of preference to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

For full details of the available seminars and all other information, please visit this link: http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/call-for-papers-2018-bsa-conference/

 

BSA election of new Trustees

As several Trustees are now approaching the end of their terms of service, the Board of Trustees of the British Shakespeare Association wishes to appoint new Trustees to take up positions on the Board in September 2017. Nominations have been received and an election is now in progress. All current members of the BSA are entitled to vote. Details on how to do this will be circulated to current members today. The ballot will close on 31st August.

 

Nominations open for our Honorary Fellowships for 2018

This year, 2017, the BSA Honorary Fellowships are to be given to Sarah Stanton—formerly Publisher of Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature Studies at Cambridge University Press—and to the actor Adrian Lester. The BSA’s Fellowship Committee would like to invite all current Members of the BSA to offer nominations for next year’s award. The choice for nomination should fulfil the following criterion: ‘The title of ‘Honorary Fellow of the British Shakespeare Association’ should be reserved for those who, at whatever level, have made, or are making, over a significant period of time, a major contribution to the field of Shakespeare activities, whether it be in Scholarship, Education more generally, or in the Performance of the plays.’ All nominations, from whichever area or constituency, require the names of two nominators (a Proposer and a Seconder) and a formal written proposal, stating the case for nomination. This text should be at least 250 words in length. The closing date for nominations is 1st September 2017. Full information on how to submit nominations are available here: http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/nominations-open-for-our-2018-fellowships/

 

Annual conferences for 2018, 2019, and 2020

The institutions that will host our three upcoming annual conferences and their titles are as follows. The BSA Annual Conference of 2018 will take place at Queen’s University Belfast on 14-17 June under the title Shakespeare Studies Today. Swansea University will host the conference in 2019 with the title Shakespeare: Race and Nation, while in 2020 it will take place at the University of Surrey and the theme will be Shakespeare in Action. We would like to thank all three institutions for the hard work they have invested in their applications, and we look forward to visiting Belfast, Swansea, and Surrey in due course. The Belfast and Swansea BSA conferences will be the first to take place in Northern Ireland and in Wales, respectively, which is enormously exciting, as the BSA would have visited all four constituent nations of the United Kingdom by the end of 2019.

 

BSA funding available for conference, events, and other activities

The BSA is able to award small amounts of money to Shakespeare-related education events, academic conferences and other activities taking place in the UK. For more information or to apply for funding, please email the Chair of the Events Committee, Susan Anderson (  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or the Chair of the Education Committee, Sarah Olive (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

 

LAST DAY: £10 Amazon voucher offered in return for your participation in a study of Teaching Shakespeare’s impact

We are currently carrying out an evaluation of the impact of Teaching Shakespeare, the British Shakespeare Association magazine, which aims to provide support for Shakespeare educators across sectors. This evaluation is being carried out by the editor and founder of the magazine Dr Sarah Olive and research assistant at the University of York, Dr Chelsea Swift. The British Shakespeare Association are also a named project partner. The aim of this evaluation is to evidence the impact of the magazine on its non-academic readership (and those who hold roles in other sectors as well as academia). This is with a view to gaining a better understanding of how it is read and used by practitioners, and how its relevance to educators and usefulness for practitioners might be strengthened. We are interested in how and why you read the magazine and whether and how the magazine has influenced or changed your thinking about, attitudes towards and practices when teaching Shakespeare.

 

As a ‘thank you’ for participating in a short telephone or Skype interview with a researcher, each interviewee will receive a £10 Amazon voucher. If you are willing and able to participate, would like further information or have any further questions, please contact Dr Chelsea Swift (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.today, July 24th, giving your name and the address to which you would like your Amazon voucher posted. We will ensure you receive it ASAP.

 

Your participation would be much appreciated, we look forward to hearing from you soon.

 

Dr Sarah Olive and Dr Chelsea Swift

 

  
ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND CONFERENCES

 

 Teachers’ Conference: Shakespeare and Creativity, The Shakespeare Centre, Stratford-upon-Avon, 3-5 August 2017 POSTPONED

Please note that the first Teachers’ Conference organised by the BSA and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust has now been postponed until further notice. We will keep members informed of future updates.


BSA ONLINE

 

The new film of Macbeth, directed by Kit Monkman (2017), reviewed by Alison Findlay and Ramona Wray

Our Chair, Professor Alison Findlay, and our trustee Dr Ramona Wray review Kit Monkman’s new film of Macbethhttp ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/a-review-of-macbeth-dir-kit-monkman-2017/

 

Report from the Living and Dying Well in the Early Modern World Conference,  University of Exeter, 15-16 June 2017

The BSA is proud to have sponsored the Living and Dying Well in the Early Modern World conference at the University of Exeter on 15th and 16th June 2017. The following report is by Bailey Sincox, a PhD student at Harvard University: http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/report-from-the-living-and-dying-well-in-the-early-modern-world-conference/

 

Reports from the Offensive Shakespeare Conference, Northumbria University, 23-24 May 2017

The BSA is proud to have sponsored the Offensive Shakespeare Conference at Northumbria University on 23rd and 24th May 2017. Our website includes reports written by those who received BSA bursaries for the event: John Rowell and Shauna O’Brien. They are available here: http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/reports-from-the-offensive-shakespeare-conference/

 

New Editors for the Education Network Blog

As of February 2017, following on from the excellent work of Dr Sarah Olive, our Education Network blog will be jointly edited by the BSA’s two Teaching Trustees: Chris Green and Karen Eckersall. Chris and Karen will welcome any contributions to the education network blog. You can contact them with articles, ideas or questions at the following email addresses: Chris Green – Karen Eckersall – More information on: http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/bsa-news/new-editors-of-the-education-network-blog/ 

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

Teaching Shakespeare 12 is out!

We are pleased to announce that the twelfth issue of Teaching Shakespeare and the first ever summer issue of the magazine, with articles on Shakespeare in Hanoi, on Shakespeare and autistic students, on young offenders and Othello, and on digitized promptbooks, is now available for free download. You can download your free copy here: http ://www  .  britishshakespeare  .  ws/bsa-news/teaching-shakespeare-12-is-out/

 

MEMBERS’ NEWSROUND

 

We are pleased to advertise news and activities by our members and other Shakespeare associations. If you would like to advertise a Shakespeare-related activity, please email our Membership Officer, José A. Pérez Díez, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Items below are not affiliated with or endorsed by the BSA – please use individual contact details for more information.

 

The Story of the Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon 1824-2016, Susan Brock and Sylvia Morris, available now.

In their new book, The Story of the Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon 1824-2016, Susan Brock and Sylvia Morris answer the question “How did it come about that a small market town in the centre of England became the focus of the worldwide worship of Shakespeare?”  After all, London’s claims were much stronger being the place where he became famous and spent the most productive years of his life. The story of the part played by the Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon, set up nearly 200 years ago by ordinary townsfolk and still in existence today, is told in this alternative history of the town. The Club was responsible for organising the first local festivities for Shakespeare’s Birthday on 23 April in 1827, 1830 and 1833. It played an important part in saving Shakespeare’ s Birthplace and setting up the Birthplace Trust. It worked towards the preservation of the Shakespeare monuments and the graves in Holy Trinity Church and it played a huge part in setting up the theatres in Stratford so that Shakespeare’s plays have a permanent home for their performance outside London. The fully-illustrated book is based on documentary evidence provided by the rich archives of the Club dating back to its foundation in 1824 and the archives of Stratford-upon-Avon which are preserved in the collections of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Published by the Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon, copies (£12.99) are available direct from www  .  stratfordshakespeareclub  .  org or write to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

King Lear (alone), one-man play with inamoment theatre.

After its highly acclaimed full outing last year, inamoment theatre's one-man play King Lear (alone) is this month appearing at the Buxton Fringe Festival (13,14 & 15) and the Bristol Shakespeare Festival (27,28 & 29). Full details can be found at www . kinglearalone . uk. Using mostly Shakespeare's words, it's an astonishing piece of immersive theatre retelling the events that led to Lear's tragedy. "I left the theatre feeling like I’d been exposed to a flawed individual at their most honest . . . " "King Lear (Alone) is a gripping production and the formidable performance given by Bob Young makes it compelling viewing."  "Bob Young in the title role, is a powerful performer. His tormented character takes shape thanks to his profound voice, whilst his presence on stage appears carefully studied..... In Bob Young's poignant (portrayal), the play is quite intense." 

 

Hamlet's Bastard by Mick Foster

This new novel developed from a well-received production of the play by Chelmsford Theatre Workshop. The CTW production took the view that the Prince and his father are selfish and rather callous characters, something that audiences overlook because of the glamour cast by the glorious language. We emphasised the cruelty of the Prince, and gave a relatively sympathetic portrayal of Claudius. The novel develops these ideas. It tells the story from the viewpoint of a bastard son of the young Prince, who interviews the survivors and uncovers a different perspective on what happened and why. The bastard son also finds himself embroiled in court politics under the Norwegian King Fortinbras. The  way he deals with the danger of being the only surviving member of the Danish royal family provides a contrast to his father's tragic story. The novel is available at http ://www . amazon . com/author/mickfoster.

 

 

 

Recommendations for Associate Editor and Upcoming Hiatus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.210  Monday, 24 July 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        Monday, July 24, 2017

Subject:   Recommendations for Associate Editor and Upcoming Hiatus 

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I have not received any applications for Associate Editor. I did receive one from someone who would assist but did not have the credentials that I desire for one I would hand over SHAKSPER to when I decide to give it up.

 

I recently had a significant birthday that made me reflect on my own mortality, so I am doubly concerned about the future of SHAKSPER. I cannot go on forever.

 

Consequently, I am changing my plea. If anyone knows of an advanced Graduate Student or tenure-track Assistant Professor who you might recommend as a possible replacement for me, please contact that person and have her send a CV and letter of interest to me. 

 

Along these lines, I am going to England for the last module in the Bodhi College Committed Practitioners’ Programme that I have been enrolled in for the past two years. I will leave late August 2 and return late August 9.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

 

Applications for Associate Editor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.205  Thursday, 13 July 2017

 

[1] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         Thursday, July 13, 2017

     Subj:         Applications for Associate Editor

 

[2] From:        Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         July 5, 2017 at 8:55:48 AM EDT

     Subj:         Re: SHAKSPER Associate Editor

 

 

[1]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, July 13, 2017

Subject:    Applications for Associate Editor

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I am soliciting applications for consideration for becoming SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor.

 

On Tuesday, July 4, 2017, I wrote a long message describing what it takes to become an Associate Editor for SHAKSPER: https://shaksper.net/current-postings/32039-becoming-shaksper-s-associate-editor .

 

At the end of the message I mentioned that “SHAKSPER has made my professional reputation, and being SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor would be an appropriate place for a young assistant or tenure-track professor to make her mark.” 

 

While some might not consider that editing and moderating SHAKSPER might not be as prestigious as editing an academic journal, I have found this not to be the case. In a PS, I added “I recently learned that I have been selected to be a recipient of the 2018 Who’s Who ‘Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award.’ The 2017 Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award recipients include Lynda Carter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Tim Cook, Colin Powell, and other academics and professionals.” I am delighted to be included in the same company as Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Tim Cook, and Colin Powell.

 

I further wrote, “I am beginning a search for an Associate Editor who I can train to take over from me when I am away. The thirtieth anniversary of SHAKSPER is approaching, and I have given thought to handing over the list to a worthy successor. The problem is that SHAKSPER is like my third daughter and giving her up feels as if I am putting a cherished child up for adoption.”

 

If you are interested in being considered such a position, please send me CV and essay about why you believe you have the interest and qualifications to edit SHAKSPER during my absences.”

 

If you are at the beginning of your career in the profession, please consider applying for this position.

 

--Hardy

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 5, 2017 at 8:55:48 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER Associate Editor

 

[Editor’s Note: The following is a message I received from Ken Steele, SHAKSPER’s founder. We all owe Ken a debt of gratitude for his vision for creating an academic discussion list dedicated to Shakespeare. Thank you, Ken. –Hardy]

 

Good morning Hardy,

 

Just wanted to let you know that I continue to be a “lurker” on SHAKSPER, actually reading more of the administrative news than the scholarly debates, watching the progress of my baby into — middle age?  

 

It’s hard to believe that it has been 27 years!  And it really puts it into perspective that all the late nights, conference presentations, and endless attempts to persuade serious scholars to join that I remember so vividly only amounted to 2 years — just the first 7% of SHAKSPER’s existence.  I have no doubt that SHAKSPER had more of a lasting impact on me, than I had on it.

 

And I can only imagine what an impact SHAKSPER has had on your own personal and professional life, for ten times as long.  In just 2 years, the tireless task of editing consumed far too much of the time I should have spent on my PhD thesis, introduced me to dozens of wonderfully generous scholars, and also to the darker side of academic rivalries and internet trolls. All of my experience was in the early, text-based and VAX-based days of the internet, prior to the invention of Google, the Mosaic browser or the world wide web. (Much less social media, mobile computing, augmented and virtual reality, and artificial intelligence).  The email listserv was cutting-edge technology when SHAKSPER began, and my job was largely convincing serious academics to learn to use it. We’ve come a long way, baby!

 

Thank you again for your tireless and diligent work, ensuring that SHAKSPER has survived and thrived for three decades!  I think the idea of enlisting an Associate Editor to assist you, and potentially to succeed you, is doubtless a necessary step to ensure that this scholarly community survives for another 30 years.

 

Yours always, 

Ken

 

Ken Steele

Higher Education Strategist, Speaker & Facilitator

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.eduvation.ca

 

 

 

Explanation for Interruption

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.204  Thursday, 13 July 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, July 13, 2017

Subject:    Explanation

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

An explanation is due for the interruption. I got a new 27”, Retina 5K iMac to replace my older one. I gave the older one to my son-in-law and told him to wipe it. I restored using Time Machine, only to find that Time Machine did not restore my apps; so, after attending a wedding in South Carolina, I spent the past days trying to restore as many of them as I could. One that I couldn’t was PhotoShop CS5.1, but I do have a working Lightroom so I don’t have to shell out for a new version.

 

This interruption is yet another reason that I need an Associate Editor to take over when I am unable to edit Newsletters myself—more to come in this regard.

 

--Hardy

 

 

 

Shakespeare at Sugarloaf

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.202  Tuesday, 4 July 2017

 

From:        Kezia Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 26, 2017 at 1:48:52 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare at Sugarloaf

 

Great free Shakespeare in Southern Ohio

MND July 23, Hamlet August 6

tecumsehdrama.com

 

On Sunday July 23, the Scioto Society will present a free performance of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Sugarloaf Mountain Amphitheatre, and on Sunday, August 6 they’ll present Hamlet.  You can order free tickets online at tecumsehdrama.com 

 

Equity actors, a great theatre. Please spread the word, especially to your local middle and high school English teachers.

 

Love,

Kezia

 

 

 

PUBLICATION OF JUNE ISSUE Early Theatre 20.1

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.201  Tuesday, 4 July 2017

 

From:        Helen M. Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 4, 2017 at 2:29:56 PM EDT

Subject:    PUBLICATION OF JUNE ISSUE Early Theatre 20.1

 

Early Theatre is pleased to announce the publication of issue 20.1, which includes the following articles, review essay, and book reviews:

ARTICLES

 

Leicester’s Men and the Lost Telomo of 1583

Domenico Lovascio

 

‘Sick interpreters’: Criticizing Historical Adaptations of Cardinal Wolsey in Shakespeare’s Henry VIII

Nadia Thérèse Van Pelt

 

Reading the Royal Entry (1604) in/as Print

Heather C. Easterling

 

Material / Blackness: Race and Its Material Reconstructions on the Seventeenth-Century English Stage

Morwenna Carr

 

The Vow Breaker and William Sampson’s Role in ‘the Anne Willoughby Affair’

Emanuel Stelzer

 

Trumpeters from China in Bristol in 1577?

Matteo Pangallo

 

A Possible Extension of Henslowe’s and Alleyn’s Sussex Network?

            Paul Quinn 

 

 

REVIEW ESSAY

 

Affective Inheritances

Lesel Dawson and Eric Langley

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

Nicole R. Rice and Margaret Aziza Pappano. The Civic Cycles: Artisan Drama and Identity. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press, 2015. Pp 360.

Reviewed by Alexandra F. Johnston

 

Elizabeth Zeman Kolkovich. The Elizabethan Country House Entertainment: Print, Performance, and Gender. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp 256.

Reviewed by Wendy Wall

 

Nicoleta Cinpoeş (ed.). Doing Kyd: Essays on The Spanish Tragedy. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016. Pp 240.

Reviewed by Marianne Montgomery

 

W.R. Streitberger. The Masters of the Revels and Elizabeth I’s Court Theatre. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp xv, 319.

Reviewed by Curtis Perry

 

Allison P. Hobgood. Passionate Playgoing in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp x, 236.

Reviewed by Katharine Goodland

 

Eoin Price. ‘Public’ and ‘Private’ Playhouses in Renaissance England: The Politics of Publication. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Pp x, 95.

Reviewed by Holger Schott Syme

 

Jerry Brotton. This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World. London: Allen Lane, 2016. Pp xv, 358.

Reviewed by Richard Allen Cave

 

Gwilym Jones. Shakespeare’s Storms. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015. Pp xi, 198.

Reviewed by Edward J. Geisweidt

 

Farah Karim-Cooper. The Hand on the Shakespearean Stage: Gesture, Touch and the Spectacle of Dismemberment. London: Bloomsbury, 2016. Pp 309.

Reviewed by Miranda Fay Thomas

 

David Crystal. The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp 704.

Reviewed by Sarah Grandage

 

Simone Chess. Male-to-Female Crossdressing in Early Modern English Literature: Gender, Performance, and Queer Relations. New York: Routledge, 2016. Pp xi, 196.

Reviewed by Jennifer Panek

 

Rebecca Yearling. Ben Jonson, John Marston and Early Modern Drama: Satire and the Audience. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2016. Pp 223.

            Reviewed by José A. Pérez Díez

 

Helen M Ostovich  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Faculty/Ostovich.html

Founding Editor, Early Theatre <http://earlytheatre.org/>

Series Editor, Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama https://www.routledge.com/performance/series/SPEMD

Series Editor, Late Tudor and Stuart Drama (https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/late-tudor-stuart-drama/)

Professor Emerita, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

Canada

 

 

 

Shakespeare First Folio Special Issue Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.200  Tuesday, 4 July 2017

 

From:        Jean-Christophe Mayer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 30, 2017 at 7:41:20 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare First Folio Special Issue Announcement 

 

Dear SHAKSPERians, 

 

Colleagues in the field of book history and Shakespearean reception (but not exclusively) may be interested in the latest special issue of Cahiers Elisabethains entitled “New Perspectives on Shakespeare’s First Folio”. It is in part devoted to the recent discovery of a new copy of an (annotated) First Folio in northern France in 2014 in the town of Douai. 

 

However, Shakespeareans and scholars in every field will also find new and stimulating thought by leading experts on what is a rare book like the First Folio and how the cultural aura around it was and is constructed.

 

As an added bonus, you can consult the entire Saint-Omer copy digitized in high definition from your desktop by clicking on this link:

 

http://bibliotheque-numerique.bibliotheque-agglo-stomer.fr/viewer/18140/?offset=#page=1&viewer=picture

 

Finally, an account of the annotations (with illustrations) was also published in Cahiers Elisabethains in June 2015:

 

https://doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.1

 

Enjoy!

 

With our very best wishes,

Line Cottegnies, Universite Paris-Sorbonne Nouvelle and Jean-Christophe Mayer (French National Centre for Scientific Research - CNRS)

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Cahiers Elisabéthains- Volume: 93, Number: 1 (July 2017)

 

New Perspectives on Shakespeare’s First Folio

 

Introduction Line Cottegnies, Jean-Christophe Mayer

The Saint-Omer Folio in its library Line Cottegnies

 

‘The strictest, orderlyest, and best bredd in the world’ Maurice Whitehead

 

Shakespeare’s First Folio and the fetish of the book Brian Cummings

 

Who edited the Shakespeare First Folio? Eric Rasmussen

 

The hero, the villain, the princess, and the book Emma Smith

 

Binding and unbinding Roger Chartier

 

 

Performance in context

 

Romeo and Juliet and ekphrastic criticism in practice Susan L Fischer

 

The ‘Cumberbatch’ Hamlet (1) Boika Sokolova, Nicoleta Cinpoeş

The ‘Cumberbatch’Hamlet (2) Aidan Elliott

 

 

Play review

 

Play review: Romeo+Juliet Alan Forrest Hickman

 

 

Books received

Books received Janice Valls-Russell

 

 

 

Becoming SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.199  Tuesday, 4 July 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Subject:     Becoming SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Since I have been taking regular trips to England, there have been several interruptions in SHAKSPER service. During these interruptions, discussion wanes. Because I am now considering participating in a three-year Dharma Teacher Training Program offered by Bodhi College, my regular trips to England might possibly continue. As a result, I am beginning a search for an Associate Editor who I can train to take over from me when I am away. The thirtieth anniversary of SHAKSPER is approaching, and I have given thought to handing over the list to a worthy successor. The problem is that SHAKSPER is like my third daughter and giving her up feels as if I am putting a cherished child up for adoption.

 

If you might be interested in such a position, please read the information below so that you know what you would be getting into and then send me CV and essay about why you believe you have the interest and qualifications to edit SHAKSPER during my absences.

 

***********

Editing SHAKSPER

 

I sometime feel that editing and moderating SHAKSPER requires the patience of Job, the judgment of Solomon, a personality that tends toward having OCD, skin thick as steel (preferably Teflon-coated), and the ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound. SHAKSPER was founded as an “academic” conference, and I still view it as such

 

On May 14, 1987, Willard McCarty then of the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at the University of Toronto founded HUMANIST as “a Bitnet/NetNorth electronic mail network for people who support computing in the humanities.” HUMANIST was the prototype for all academic e-mail distribution lists. Kenneth Steele, then a graduate student at the University of Toronto, inspired by HUMANIST, decided to found a similar list dedicated to Shakespeare. The name he chose was SHAKSPER; at the time, for technical reasons, list names could be no longer than eight characters. On July 26, 1990, Steele’s dream became reality.

 

I met Ken Steele at the 1990 Shakespeare Association of America annual meeting in Philadelphia. We were both members of a seminar on computing approaches to Shakespeare. He told me about his plans for the Shakespeare Conference, and I expressed my interest. About a dozen Shakespeareans including myself formed the core of founding members. On February 21, 1992, I became SHAKSPER’s co-editor, at first being responsible for the file server. On March 25, I took over the editing of the daily submissions into the digests. On June 3, Ken decided to take a leave of absence from his graduate studies, and I became SHAKSPER’s owner, editor, and moderator. At that time, the 293 members were virtually all from academia. As of July 4, 2017, about a thousand subscribers receive SHAKSPER Newsletters (a digest of e-mails discussion threads and announcements, edited into a single newsletter that is then e-mailed to subscribers). In addition, the SHAKSPER Facebook page has almost 890 followers. On the Facebook page, I post a table of contents to the Newsletter’s digests with links to the individual discussion threads, announcements, and so on.

 

SHAKSPER is an edited and moderated e-mail discussion list. Most of my work for it involves preparing the daily newsletters, into which I group related messages into threads. Several times a day, I check the inbox of This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., the account to which all SHAKSPER submissions are routed. I delete spam and other irrelevant messages. I respond to inquiries from members and non-members as appropriate. I do not answer questions from students requesting I do their homework assignments for them, although on occasion I direct some to an Internet or library resource that might assist them. I do not post messages directed to individuals and not of interest to the conference. Furthermore, I can intervene when an inadvertently mistaken forward or personal response comes to the list rather than to the person to whom it was intended, avoiding both the sometimes-embarrassing mistake and the inevitable apology for it. I also can “kill” messages that someone may write and afterwards have second thoughts about posting. Finally, inappropriate topics, such as the so-called “Authorship” controversy that has been banned from discussion since the mid-1990s, are returned to the submitter without comment. 

 

When I come across a message intended for the list, I save that e-mail as a rich-text file in a folder on my hard drive. I assign each of these e-mails a short name and number identifying it as belonging to an on-going thread or as being a new inquiry, announcement, or other communication for SHAKSPER. Once a day, usually in the morning, I edit and format the messages into a newsletter. Each newsletter has a header and a table of contents for ease in reading and citing. The table of contents includes the name and e-mail address of each person making a posting, the date of the submission, and the subject. I format these digests in Word, using macros I have created to manage repetitive tasks. My formatting involves imposing a consistent “look and feel” to the newsletters – all paragraphs are single-spaced and flush with the left margin. I remove unnecessary carriage returns so that each paragraph will word wrap in any browser-mailer used to read it. Paragraphs are separated by a single blank line. I also lightly edit, correcting obvious typos, reducing signatures to the barest essentials, and generally making the digests conform to a recognizable style, the full block format, I have imposed on them over the years. After I have finished formatting and editing individual “articles,” I use the Joomla platform to save and then to format them into a newsletter that I e-mail to all members on the list. In addition to these “articles,” digests, and newsletters, many SHAKSPER pages require regular updating: some daily, some weekly, some monthly, and others as needed. This updating of pages is just one of the tasks of maintaining the SHAKSPER web site, work that I have been trying to “farm” out in recent years. SHAKSPER is not open to automatic subscription; prospective members are requested to supply brief autobiographies. Thus, another part of my work for SHAKSPER includes adding and deleting members and maintaining the biography and membership files for my own use. Technical problems associated with running a list are handled by Ron Severdia, who hosts SHAKSPER and who moved SHAKSPER from the Listserv platform to Joomla. 

 

**********

 

If you have read this far you may be interested in being considered for the positions of SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor. Again, I am requesting a CV and an essay expressing your interest and qualifications. Keep in mind that I have been a Department Chair and have read thousands of CV and cover letters.

 

SHAKSPER has made my professional reputation, and being SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor would be an appropriate place for a young assistant or tenure-track professor to make her mark.

 

Thank you for your time and consideration.

 

Fondly,

Hardy M. Cook, Ph.D.  

Professor Emeritus 

Bowie State University 

Editor of SHAKSPER: The Global Electronic Shakespeare Conference <shaksper.net>   

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

PS: I recently learned that I have been selected to be a recipient of the 2018 Who’s Who “Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award.” The 2017 Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award recipients include Lynda Carter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Tim Cook, Colin Powell, and other academics and professionals. I will be included on the 2018 Lifetime Achievement web site and in the 2018 Who’s Who in America with a page of my own.

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Marx Conference at Garrick’s Temple

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.197  Wednesday, 14 June 2017

 

From:        Paul Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 14, 2017 at 12:59:40 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Marx Conference at Garrick’s Temple

 

KINGSTON SHAKESPEARE SEMINAR AT GARRICK’S TEMPLE

 

 

SHAKESPEARE AND MARX

SATURDAY JUNE 24, 2017

 

10.00: Chair: Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

 David Hawkes (Arizona State University)
‘Marx and Shakespeare Today: Towards an Ethics of Representation’

 

11.00: Coffee

 

11.30: Chair: Kiernan Ryan (Royal Holloway University)

Chris Fitter (Rutgers University)
‘Shakespeare and the Tudor Ferment: A Marxist Homecoming?’

Gabriel Egan (De Montfort University):
‘Shakespeare::Marx && community::writing’

 

13.00: Lunch (Bell Inn, Hampton)

 

14.00: Chair: David Schalkwyk (Queen Mary University)

 Christian Smith (Independent scholar, Berlin)
‘“Ay, his breast. So says the bond”:
Marx, Shakespeare and the Theory of Labour Power’

Martin McQuillan (Kingston University):
‘Marx’s Timon: Reading and Quantitative Easing’

 

15.30: Tea

 

16.00: Chair: Aaron Kitch (Bowdoin College)

Hugh Grady (Arcadia University):
‘Shakespeare and Marx:  A Select Genealogy’

 

17.00: Round Table Discussion

 

19.45: Chamber Concert: Marx’s Music (Lovekyn Consort)

 

Tickets are £20 (includes sandwich lunch, coffee and tea) and £12 for the concert.

 

All proceeds go to supporting the Temple.

 

Please register for the symposium and / or concert on Eventbrite

Getting to the Temple

See also the Facebook event page!

 

 

 

 

Planned Interruption

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.196  Wednesday, 14 June 2017

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Subject:    Planned Interruption

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Tomorrow afternoon, I leave for two weeks in England—Devon and West Sussex.

 

Keep submissions coming and I will get to them when I return July 1.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

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