1998

First British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1207  Monday, 30 November 1998.

From:           Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Mon, 30 Nov 1998 10:47:30 GMT
Subject:        First British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

Conference Posting

The First British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

23-25 June 1999

At The Shakespeare Institute, Church Street,
Stratford-upon-Avon CV37 6HP, UK

The Shakespeare Institute is hosting the First British Graduate
Shakespeare Conference from 23-25 June 1999. The conference is intended
to give an opportunity for graduate students from British and Irish
universities to meet together to discuss their work. All graduate
students are invited to give 20-minute papers at the conference. There
will be none of the usual predictable plenary lectures from established
academics. Instead there will be sessions with actors in the productions
in the Royal Shakespeare Company's repertory and panel discussions about
academic research and career opportunities.

The scope of the conference will be Shakespeare's work and the work of
his contemporary dramatists. Any student taking a post-graduate course
of any kind at a British or Irish institution is welcome to register.

Conference Registration fee: stlg20 (covering the opening reception and
lunches but not accommodation or theatre tickets)

Further details from Janet Costa, The Shakespeare Institute, or on
e-mail at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or our conference web-site
www.geocities.com/Broadway/8017/

Peter Holland
Director, The Shakespeare Institute

Ren

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1206  Monday, 30 November 1998.

From:           Marili Villa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sun, 29 Nov 1998 14:54:21 +0100
Subject:        Ren


Re: Honan; Presentism; Sheep

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1204  Monday, 30 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Nov 1998 09:34:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1200 Re: Honan

[2]     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Nov 1998 14:03:49 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1202 Re: Presentism

[3]     From:   Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Nov 1998 10:08:12 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1195 Re: Sheep


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Nov 1998 09:34:59 -0500
Subject: 9.1200 Re: Honan
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1200 Re: Honan

I have been impressed with Honan's biography so far, for giving some
sense of what a glover's son in Stratford might grow up to know about
the bourgeoisie, trade with the Dutch, feminine apprentices, sheep,
theft, petty-proud guildsmen, Ovid, poaching, wattle-and-daub,
recusancy, money worries, family loyalty, illegitimate children.  Though
I talked with Park Honan several years ago about various computer
studies of Shakespeare (including one I had done with an honors student
that analysed the 1593 quarto of RIII in terms of the frequency of words
having to do with gender, emotion, and the senses), he seemed interested
but certainly not obsessed with what computers might uncover about
acting roles or authorship.

If the biography is published in a paper version, I would be happy to
assign it in a tragedies, histories, or comedies course.

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Nov 1998 14:03:49 -0000
Subject: 9.1202 Re: Presentism
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1202 Re: Presentism

You've been at the zinfandel again Bill,

I think that Terry's proposition is really very straightforward one. How
can you look at the past from ANY position save that of the present? All
narratives of the past are from the position of the present- how can
they be otherwise?  That's the point that Stephen Greenblatt makes in
the introductory chapter of Shakespearean Negotiations.  That's not the
answer to the problem of course, but it does stop us from seeking refuge
in lazy, glib, and frankly, knee-jerk, moralizing.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 10:08:12 +1100
Subject: 9.1195 Re: Sheep
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1195 Re: Sheep

> > With regard to the proceeds to be derived from sheep, a small
> > qualification may be in order. I have been told that in the past sheep
> > (like people) were a lot smaller than they are now. At least, this was
> > the case in the eighteenth century, and it is hardly likely that they
> > shrunk after say 1600, to start growing again between 1800 and now. The
> > size of sheep would, I imagine, also affect the amount of wool they
> > produce, and definitely the amount of meat. Unfortunately, I only have
> > this information from hearsay, so I cannot refer the list to any
> > quotable sources.

I'm afraid I don't have a source either, but I'd always understood the
modern larger sheep to be a result of C18 selective breeding, part to
the Agricultural Revolution.

Peter Groves,
Department of English,
Monash University,
Melbourne

Importance of GRE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1205  Monday, 30 November 1998.

From:           Bob Evans <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Nov 1998 20:34:39 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Importance of GRE

So that I may give the best possible advice to prospective graduate
students, I ask that anyone who has opinions about the importance of the
GRE to admission to strong graduate programs please communicate these
opinions to me privately.  In particular, I am often asked how heavily
the GRE is weighed against other factors such as writing samples,
letters of recommendation, undergraduate transcripts, awards or
recognitions, conference presentations or publications, etc.

Thanks in advance to anyone willing to share his/her thoughts on this
topic.

With best wishes,

Bob Evans
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A Tribute to Flip Wilson

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1203  Monday, 30 November 1998.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, November 30, 1998
Subject:        A Tribute to Flip Wilson

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I am sure that many are wondering how SHAKSPER could possibly be a venue
for a tribute to the African-American comic Flip Wilson, who died last
week. Well, Flip Wilson used to tell what I thought was the funniest
Shakespearean spin-off joke I ever heard.

The joke itself is one of those formula stories that last up to twenty
minutes.  I cannot possibly do justice to it, but the whole point of the
joke is the punch line.  So with my sincerest apologies to Flip Wilson,
I will attempt to relate the sense of the story.

Once upon a time in ancient Rome, there lived a Roman named Herman and
so and so on.

During these times, berries were highly praised and so on and so on.

As it turns out, poor Herman grew the biggest, most fabulous berry that
Rome had ever seen and so on and so on.

This berry was so spectacular that Herman got an idea and began to
charge admission for the Romans to come and admire his magnificent berry
and so on and so on.

The authorities heard of the berry and the profits this once poor man
was making and so on and so on.

A troop of Roman guards appeared at Herman's door.

Herman, thinking they had come as others had to see his berry said,
"Have you come to praise my berry?"

The leader of the guards replied, "No, we have come to seize your berry
not to praise it."

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