2003

Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0667  Friday, 7 April 2003

From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Apr 2003 08:20:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0578 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0578 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

John Drakakis writes, "The secret's out: Love's Labours Wonne is
Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Measure For Measure
(problem), All's Well That Ends Well, Much Ado About Nothing etc. etc.
Mind you, whisper it noth in Gath, but Shakespeare wrote the script for
Robocop!"

It appears that John Drakakis, and others, do make light of the
suggested existence of "Love labours wonne."  I thought it might be
instructive to all to recall that the play was listed by Francis Meres
in Shakespearean English of 1598 in his Palladis Tamia, Wit's Treasury,
accordingly:

"So the sweet wittie soul of Ovid lives in melliflous and honytongued
Shakespeare, witnes his Venus and Adonis, his Lucrece, his sugred
Sonnets among his private frinds...the most passionate among us to
bewail and bemoan the perplexities of love...so Shakespeare among
y'English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage: for Comedy,
witnes his Ge'tleme' of Verona, his Errors [The Comedy of...], his Love
labors lost, his Love labours wonne, his Midsummer night dreame, and his
Merchant of Venice: for Tragedy his Richard the 2.  Richard the 3.
Henry the 4. [assumed, Parts I and II combined] King John, Titus
andronicus and his Romeo and Juliet."

This is an early and historically accurate list of the known and
accepted writings, poetry and plays of Will Shakespeare, and certain
conclusions can be drawn.  The play is listed as a "Comedy" by a
contemporary and is attributed to the same author, and it is listed as a
separate play from known plays--such as MND and "Ge'tleme' of Verona."

Unless there is another earlier list than this one [brought to my
attention by Samuel Schoenbaum's Shakespeare's Lives], it appears that
"Love labours wonne" is not to be confused with others cited in the 1598
list by Francis Meres.

Perhaps there are other early lists, of which I am not aware?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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Virus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0666  Friday, 7 April 2003

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, April 07, 2003
Subject:        Virus

Dear SHAKSPEReans:

It appears that two messages from 2001 were used to distribute a virus
(W32.Bugbear@mm virus).

Once again I had nothing to do with this and in this case SHAKSPER's
listserv software did NOT send out the messages.

I can only repeat that anyone how uses e-mail should never open
attachments and simply delete anything that looks in the least bit
suspicious.

Hardy

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Another New Educational Website

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0664  Friday, 4 April 2003

From:           H. S. Toshack <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Apr 2003 06:30:09 +0700
Subject:        Another New Educational Website

Well, quite new. Lit Works.com offers resources in pdf format to support
the study of Literature texts at high school and undergraduate level. At
the moment it carries line-by-line commentaries on 'Macbeth', 'Othello'
and 'Hamlet'  ('Lear' is at the planning stage).  Since the pdf files
can be saved, printed and searched, they are very flexible study tools.

We wish to expand the site, and would be happy to consider proposals
from SHAKSPEReans for further commentaries - or other relevant material.

You are most welcome to visit: http://www.litworks.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Second Blackfriars Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0665  Friday, 7 April 2003

From:           Susan Hawthorne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Apr 2003 08:00:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Second Blackfriars Conference

Shenandoah Shakespeare announces the second Blackfriars Conference 22
October -- 26 October 2003.

Papers:  We invite papers about Shakespeare, performance and related
topics.  All papers will be presented in plenary sessions but are
limited to ten minutes.  Papers that include the use of our actors may
be thirteen minutes.

Workshops:  Workshops can be up to 45 minutes in length and some may be
simultaneous.

Guest Speakers:  Our speakers this year include Andrew Gurr, Stanley
Wells, and Tina Packer.

Cost:  Registration is $250.00 and includes tickets to four shows, and
several meals.

Details:  Owing to the fall foliage season lodging will be at a
premium.  We, therefore, recommend that you make your hotel, motel, or
b&b reservations early.

Deadlines:  15 May 2003--general registration
            15 June 2003--for submission of abstracts

Contact:  Susan Hawthorne, Deputy Executive Director
          540-885-5588
          This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
------------------------------------------------------

Many thanks,
Susan Hawthorne
Deputy Executive Director
Shenandoah Shakespeare

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: The Real Beale

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0663  Friday, 4 April 2003

From:           S. L. Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 04 Apr 2003 11:42:14 +0200
Subject: 14.0646 Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0646 Re: The Real Beale

   Martin Steward challenged,

>If Sam has found Mozart's "Tempest" opera he has a duty to humanity to
>let us all know!
>
>Ah! If only! IF ONLY! Now there's "such stuff as dreams are made on".

"The Tempest" doesn't map seamlessly onto Mozart's "The Magic Flute" but
the opera does have some elements of the play as important features,
among them:

A prince finds himself alone in a strange land and is made aware of the
existence of a young princess, whose hand to win he must perform various
tests of character.  The witch figure, the Queen  of the night,  is a
mother (albeit that of the princess).  There is a Caliban figure, who is
the minion serially of the father and the  mother, and who lusts after
the princess.  Ariel is present in the form of the three agents of the
Queen of the Night who save the Prince from the dragon in the opening
scene (which creature can be understood as a metamorphosised storm),
and again in the form of the three boys who prevent the prince and
princess from acts of despair. The father is a powerful and good
purveyor of magic.  And of course "marvellous sweet music" imbedded in
the plot as distinct from the score of the opera.

I wouldn't have thought of this connection had I not had the pleasure of
viewing Ingmar Bergman's filming of a Drottingham Palace (Sweden)
production of the Opera.  During the interval the camera took us
backstage, lighting first on the "father" studying the libretto of
"Parsifal",  and then on the mother figure treating her coloratura vocal
cords to a cigarette below a "no smoking" sign.  The camera continues to
wander the backstage area, finally coming to a secluded corner where we
find the Prince and the princess...playing chess!

Shakespeare quotations can be very satisfying, the subtler the better.
But there should be a "spinoff"  list that wouldn't force the sublime
(in whose number I personally would include, for example, "The Last
Action Hero" takeoff) to rub shoulders with the ridiculous and worse.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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